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Australian Emissions Reduction Subsidy Policy under Persistent Productivity Shocks

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  • Ramezani, Fariba
  • Harvie, Charles
  • Arjomandi, Amir

Abstract

The implementation of emissions reduction policies in Australia has experienced significant volatility over the last decade and remains in doubt due to different attitudes towards such policies by policy makers. One of the critical concerns of policy makers is that the costs of these policies would adversely affect economic activity and result in larger economic volatility. This paper investigates how business cycle fluctuations of the Australian economy, arising from productivity shocks, would be affected under an abatement reduction subsidy policy in which the regulator supports abatement efforts in each period. To answer this question, a real business cycle (RBC) model is applied. The responses of economic and environmental variables to unexpected productivity shocks are presented and compared. The results indicate that the regulator should adjust the abatement subsidy to be pro-cycle, i.e. increase during expansion and decrease during recessions.
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Suggested Citation

  • Ramezani, Fariba & Harvie, Charles & Arjomandi, Amir, 2016. "Australian Emissions Reduction Subsidy Policy under Persistent Productivity Shocks," 2016 Conference (60th), February 2-5, 2016, Canberra, Australia 235585, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare16:235585
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    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • O56 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Oceania
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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