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Conditional Aid Effectiveness. A Meta Study

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  • Hristos Doucouliagos
  • Martin Paldam

    () (Department of Economics, University of Aarhus, Denmark)

Abstract

The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) studies the effect of development aid using econome¬ trics on macro data. It contains about 100 papers of which a third analyzes conditional models where aid effectiveness depends upon z, so that aid only works for a certain range of the variable. The key term in this family of AEL models is thus an interaction term of z times aid. The leading candidates for z are a good policy index and aid itself. In this paper, meta- analysis techniques are used (i) to determine whether the AEL has established the said interaction terms, and (ii) to identify some of the determinants of the differences in results between studies. Taking all available studies in consideration, we find no support for conditionality with respect to policy, while conditionality regarding aid itself is dubious. However, the results differ depending on the authors’ institutional affiliation.

Suggested Citation

  • Hristos Doucouliagos & Martin Paldam, 2005. "Conditional Aid Effectiveness. A Meta Study," Economics Working Papers 2005-14, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
  • Handle: RePEc:aah:aarhec:2005-14
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Charles C. Chang & Eduardo Fernández-Arias & Luis Serven, 1998. "Measuring Aid Flows: A New Approach," Research Department Publications 4146, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    2. Ashenfelter, Orley & Harmon, Colm & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1999. "A review of estimates of the schooling/earnings relationship, with tests for publication bias," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 453-470, November.
    3. Paul Collier & David Dollar, 2004. "Development effectiveness: what have we learnt?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(496), pages 244-271, June.
    4. Herbertsson, Tryggvi Thor & Martin Paldam, 2005. "Does development aid help poor countries catch up?," Economics Working Papers 2005-16, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    5. Hristos Doucouliagos & Martin Paldam, 2005. "Aid Effectiveness on Growth. A Meta Study," Economics Working Papers 2005-13, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    6. T. D. Stanley, 2005. "Beyond Publication Bias," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 309-345, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Aid effectiveness; meta study; economic growth; policy conditionality;

    JEL classification:

    • B2 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925
    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid

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