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Natural Capital, Sustainability and Productivity: An Exploration of the Linkages

In: The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress 2002: Towards a Social Understanding of Productivity

Author

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  • Nancy Olewiler

    (Professor of Economics, Simon Fraser University)

Abstract

The issue of sustainability of natural capital and implications for economic growth ranks high in the interests of both policy makers and the general public, as manifested by the intense debate on Canada's ratification of the Kyoto accord. In this chapter, Nancy Olewiler makes an important contribution to the debate on natural resource sustainability by exploring the crucial, but often ignored, role of productivity in the maintenance of natural capital sustainability. Olewiler defines sustainability as the ability of the economy to maintain the flow of production necessary to ensure non-decreasing per capita consumption indefinitely, so future generations can have a standard of living equal to or better than that of the present generation. She makes a critical distinction between the concepts of strong and weak sustainability.

Suggested Citation

  • Nancy Olewiler, 2002. "Natural Capital, Sustainability and Productivity: An Exploration of the Linkages," The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress,in: Andrew Sharpe, Executive Director & France St-Hilaire, Vice-President , Research & Keith Banting, Di (ed.), The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress 2002: Towards a Social Understanding of Productivity, volume 2 Centre for the Study of Living Standards;The Institutute for Research on Public Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:sls:repsls:v:2:y:2002:no
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    File URL: http://www.csls.ca/repsp/2/nancyolewiler.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Centre for the Study of Living Standards, 2003. "Productivity Trends in Natural Resources Industries in Canada," CSLS Research Reports 2003-01, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    2. Andrew Sharpe, 2004. "Exploring the Linkages between Productivity and Social Development in Market Economies," CSLS Research Reports 2004-02, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Natural Resources; Resources; Non-renewable; Renewable; Productivity; Sustainability; Growth; Labour Productivity; Labor Productivity; Technology; Technological Change; Environment; Environmental; Environmental Services; Multifactor Productivity; Multi-factor Productivity; Total Factor Productivity; Pollution; Emissions;

    JEL classification:

    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • Q31 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • L72 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Primary Products and Construction - - - Mining, Extraction, and Refining: Other Nonrenewable Resources
    • L73 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Primary Products and Construction - - - Forest Products
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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