IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/pal/palchp/978-0-230-59845-4_15.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

Public and Private Sector Labour Markets

In: The Labour Market Under New Labour

Author

Listed:
  • Peter Dolton
  • Steven McIntosh

Abstract

Average pay is higher in the public sector than in the private sector, although the difference has shrunk over the last 25 years. The distribution of pay is narrower in the public sector than in the private sector. The public-private sector pay differential is higher for women than for men. In recent years, private sector pay in professional occupations has overtaken public sector pay in these occupations, particularly for men. The public-private sector pay differential is lowest in London and the South-East, and indeed is now negative for men in these regions. The public-private sector pay differential is lowest for graduates, and again has recently become negative for male graduates. Public sector workers are less likely to report that they have a competitive salary or work for a progressive organisation, although they report more challenging work, more socially useful work, and greater long-term security.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Dolton & Steven McIntosh, 2003. "Public and Private Sector Labour Markets," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Richard Dickens & Paul Gregg & Jonathan Wadsworth (ed.), The Labour Market Under New Labour, chapter 14, pages 214-231, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:palchp:978-0-230-59845-4_15
    DOI: 10.1057/9780230598454_15
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Dolton, Peter & Makepeace, Gerry, 2008. "The Impact of the Public Sector Pay Review Bodies in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 3373, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Leuze, Kathrin, 2010. "Smooth Path or Long and Winding Road? How Institutions Shape the Transition from Higher Education to Work," EconStor Books, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, number 251573.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pal:palchp:978-0-230-59845-4_15. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.palgrave.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no bibliographic references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Sonal Shukla or Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.palgrave.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.