IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/nbr/nberch/6559.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

Rationalizing School Spending: Efficiency, Externalities, and Equity, and Their Connection to Rising Costs

In: Individual and Social Responsibility: Child Care, Education, Medical Care, and Long-Term Care in America

Author

Listed:
  • Eric A. Hanushek

Abstract

The analytical base for much of the current education discussion is built on school attainment simple years of school completed. This choice is convenient for both theoretical and empirical discussions and is undeniably useful in many contexts. Nevertheless, the central focus of current policy deliberation is quality of schooling, not quantity, and the arguments and analysis pertaining to quantity do not readily transfer to quality. The central thesis of this paper is straightforward. Much of the policy discussion about education is built on a poor understanding of the underlying structure of education and schools, but the ambiguities and uncertainties lead to systematic biases toward increased spending on schools. Evidence on high rates of return to investment in quantity of schooling are translated into increased spending aimed at improving quality, yet with little assurance of actual improvement. Similarly, concerns about equity and about externalities from schooling push spending up without satisfying these objectives. A related issue, addressed at the end of the paper, is how citizens view spending in the context of their local districts. Preliminary analysis of voting on school budgets in New York State suggests no systematic relationship between performance of schools (measured in terms of student achievement) and willingness to support proposed budgets.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Eric A. Hanushek, 1996. "Rationalizing School Spending: Efficiency, Externalities, and Equity, and Their Connection to Rising Costs," NBER Chapters, in: Individual and Social Responsibility: Child Care, Education, Medical Care, and Long-Term Care in America, pages 59-106, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:6559
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c6559.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Andrei Shleifer, 1998. "State versus Private Ownership," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 133-150, Fall.
    2. Johnson, George E & Stafford, Frank P, 1996. "On the Rate of Return to Schooling Quality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 686-691, November.
    3. Hanushek, Eric A. & Leung, Charles Ka Yui & Yilmaz, Kuzey, 2003. "Redistribution through education and other transfer mechanisms," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(8), pages 1719-1750, November.
    4. Edward L. Glaeser, 2012. "Urban Public Finance," NBER Working Papers 18244, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Ostermaier, Andreas & Beltz, Philipp & Link, Susanne, 2013. "Do university policies matter? Effects of Course Policies on Performance," VfS Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79924, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:6559. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no bibliographic references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.