IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/nbr/nberch/12107.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

The Buck Stops Where? The Distribution of Agricultural Subsidies

In: The Intended and Unintended Effects of U.S. Agricultural and Biotechnology Policies

Author

Listed:
  • Barry K. Goodwin
  • Ashok K. Mishra
  • François Ortalo-Magné

Abstract

The U.S. has a long history of providing generous support for the agricultural sector. A recent omnibus package of farm legislation, the 2008 Farm Bill (P.L. 110-246) will provide in excess of $284 billion in financial support to U.S. agriculture over the 2008-2012 period. Commodity program payments account for $43.3 billion of this total. Our paper is concerned with the distribution of these benefits. Farm subsidies make agricultural production more profitable by increasing and stabilizing farm prices and incomes. If these benefits are expected to persist, farm land values should capture the subsidy benefits. We use a large sample of individual farm land values to investigate the extent of this capitalization of benefits. Our results confirm that subsidies have a very significant impact on farm land values and thus suggest that landowners are the real benefactors of farm programs. As land is exchanged, new owners will pay prices that reflect these benefits, leaving the benefits of farm programs in the hands of former owners that may be exiting production. Approximately 45% of U.S. farmland is operated by someone other than the owner. We report evidence that owners benefit not only from capital gains but also from lease rates which incorporate a significant portion of agricultural payments even if the farm legislation mandates that benefits must be allocated to producers. Finally, we examine rental agreements for farmers that rent land on both a cash and share basis. We find evidence that farm programs that are meant to stabilize farm prices provide a valuable insurance benefit.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Barry K. Goodwin & Ashok K. Mishra & François Ortalo-Magné, 2011. "The Buck Stops Where? The Distribution of Agricultural Subsidies," NBER Chapters,in: The Intended and Unintended Effects of U.S. Agricultural and Biotechnology Policies, pages 15-50 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:12107
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c12107.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. White, T. Kirk & Hoppe, Robert A., 2012. "Changing Farm Structure and the Distribution of Farm Payments and Federal Crop Insurance," Economic Information Bulletin 120309, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Robbins, Michael W. & White, T. Kirk, 2014. "Direct Payments, Cash Rents, Land Values, and the Effects of Imputation in U.S. Farm-level Data," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 1-20, December.
    3. Hendricks, Nathan P. & Janzen, Joseph P. & Dhuyvetter, Kevin C., 2012. "Subsidy Incidence and Inertia in Farmland Rental Markets: Estimates from a Dynamic Panel," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 1-18.
    4. Barrett E. Kirwan & Michael J. Roberts, 2016. "Who Really Benefits from Agricultural Subsidies? Evidence from Field-level Data," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1095-1113.
    5. Feichtinger, Paul & Salhofer, Klaus, 2011. "The Valuation of Agricultural Land and the Influence of Government Payments," Factor Markets Working Papers 112, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    6. Christophe Gouel, 2014. "Food Price Volatility and Domestic Stabilization Policies in Developing Countries," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Food Price Volatility, pages 261-306 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Feichtinger, Paul & Salhofer, Klaus, 2013. "A Spatial Analysis of Agricultural Land Prices in Bavaria," Working papers 160741, Factor Markets, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    8. repec:fip:fedkrw:rwp2013-07 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Jeremy G. Weber & Jason Brown & John Pender, 2013. "Rural wealth creation and emerging energy industries: lease and royalty payments to farm households and businesses," Research Working Paper RWP 13-07, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    10. Jaclyn D. Kropp & Ani L. Katchova, 2011. "The effects of direct payments on liquidity and repayment capacity of beginning farmers," Agricultural Finance Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 71(3), pages 347-365, November.
    11. Bolarinwa, Olufemi & Onel, Gulcan & Kropp, Jaclyn D. & Moss, Charles B., 2014. "A Relative Information Approach to Modeling Dynamics of U.S. Farmland Values," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170708, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. Ifft, Jennifer & Cooper, Joseph C. & Kuethe, Todd H., 2012. "The Impact of Risk and Farm Program Design on Cash Rents," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124334, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:12107. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.