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Happiness and the Standard of Living: The Case of South Africa

In: Handbook on the Economics of Happiness

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  • Nattavudh Powdthavee

Abstract

This book is a welcome consolidation and extension of the recent expanding debates on happiness and economics. Happiness and economics, as a new field for research, is now of pivotal interest particularly to welfare economists and psychologists. This Handbook provides an unprecedented forum for discussion of the economic issues relating to happiness. It reviews the more recent literature and offers the interested reader an insight into the vast scope of the field in terms of the theory, its applications and also experimental design. The Handbook also gives substantial indications as to the future direction of research in the field, with particular regard to policy applications and developing an economics of interpersonal relations which includes reciprocity and social interaction theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Nattavudh Powdthavee, 2007. "Happiness and the Standard of Living: The Case of South Africa," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Happiness, chapter 21 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:3437_21
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    Cited by:

    1. Byela Tibesigwa & Martine Visser & Brennan Hodkinson, 2016. "Effects of Objective and Subjective Income Comparisons on Subjective Wellbeing," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 361-389, August.
    2. Tim Hinks & Simon Davies, 2008. "Life satisfaction in Malawi and the importance of relative consumption, polygamy and religion," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(7), pages 888-904.
    3. Timothy Hinks, 2012. "Fractionalization and well-being: Evidence from a new South African data set," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(3), pages 253-271, December.
    4. Dorrit Posel & Daniela Casale, 2011. "Relative standing and subjective well-being in South Africa: The role of perceptions, expectations and income mobility," Working Papers 210, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    5. Ebrahim, Amina, 2010. "The Determinants Of Happiness Among Race Groups In South Africa," Honours Students' Projects 2010 107588, Rhodes University, Department of Economics and Economic History.
    6. Nattavudh Powdthavee, 2009. "How important is rank to individual perception of economic standing? A within-community analysis," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 7(3), pages 225-248, September.
    7. Graham, Carol, 2005. "Globalization, Poverty, Inequality, and Insecurity: Some Insights from the Economics of Happiness," WIDER Working Paper Series 033, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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    Keywords

    Economics and Finance;

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