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Introduction

In: Handbook on Contingent Valuation

Author

Listed:
  • Anna Alberini
  • James R. Kahn

Abstract

The Handbook on Contingent Valuation is unique in that it focuses on contingent valuation as a method for evaluating environmental change. It examines econometric issues, conceptual underpinnings, implementation issues as well as alternatives to contingent valuation. Anna Alberini and James Kahn have compiled a comprehensive and original reference volume containing invaluable case studies that demonstrate the implementation of contingent valuation in a wide variety of applications. Chapters include those on the history of contingent valuation, a practical guide to its implementation, the use of experimental approaches, an ecological economics perspective on contingent valuation and approaches for developing nations.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Alberini & James R. Kahn, 2006. "Introduction," Chapters,in: Handbook on Contingent Valuation, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:1893_1
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    Cited by:

    1. Fidrmuc, Jarko & Hainz, Christa, 2008. "Integrating with Their Feet: Cross-Border Lending at the German-Austrian Border," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 248, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
    2. Martin Schlotter & Guido Schwerdt & Ludger Woessmann, 2011. "Econometric methods for causal evaluation of education policies and practices: a non-technical guide," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 109-137.
    3. Qiang Chen, 2015. "Climate shocks, dynastic cycles and nomadic conquests: evidence from historical China," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(2), pages 185-204.

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    Keywords

    Economics and Finance; Environment;

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