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Valuing Health and Longevity in Regulatory Analysis: Current Issues and Challenges

In: Handbook on the Politics of Regulation

Author

Listed:
  • Lisa A. Robinson
  • James K. Hammitt

Abstract

This unique Handbook offers the most up-to-date and comprehensive, state-of-the-art reviews of the politics of regulation. It presents and discusses the core theories and concepts of regulation in response to the rise of the regulatory state and regulatory capitalism, and in the context of the ‘golden age of regulation’. Its eleven sections include forty-eight chapters covering issues as diverse and varied as: theories of regulation; historical perspectives on regulation; regulation of old and new media; risk regulation, enforcement and compliance; better regulation; civil regulation; European regulatory governance; and global regulation. As a whole, it provides an essential point of reference for all those working on the political, social, and economic aspects of regulation.

Suggested Citation

  • Lisa A. Robinson & James K. Hammitt, 2011. "Valuing Health and Longevity in Regulatory Analysis: Current Issues and Challenges," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Politics of Regulation, chapter 30 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13210_30
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781848440050.00046.xml
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hammitt, James K. & Robinson, Lisa A., 2011. "The Income Elasticity of the Value per Statistical Life: Transferring Estimates between High and Low Income Populations," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(01), pages 1-29, January.
    2. Sunstein, Cass R., 2013. "The value of a statistical life: some clarifications and puzzles," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(02), pages 237-261, August.
    3. Robinson Lisa A. & Hammitt James K., 2013. "Skills of the trade: valuing health risk reductions in benefit-cost analysis," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 107-130, March.
    4. repec:spr:eujhec:v:18:y:2017:i:7:d:10.1007_s10198-016-0852-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Alberini, Anna & Ščasný, Milan, 2013. "Exploring heterogeneity in the value of a statistical life: Cause of death v. risk perceptions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 143-155.
    6. Pinto Prades, Jose Luis & Brey Sanchez, Raul, 2014. "Age effects in mortality risk valuation," Health Economics Working Paper Series 201401, Glasgow Caledonian University, Yunus Centre.

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