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Ryan Heath Peters

Personal Details

First Name:Ryan
Middle Name:Heath
Last Name:Peters
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppe422

Affiliation

(50%) Finance Department
Wharton School of Business
University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)
http://finance.wharton.upenn.edu/

: 215.898.7622
215.898.6200
2300 Steinberg Hall - Dietrich Hall, 3620 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6367
RePEc:edi:fdupaus (more details at EDIRC)

(25%) Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Chicago, Illinois (United States)
http://www.chicagofed.org/

: 312/322-5322
312/322-5515
P.O. Box 834, 230 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60690-0834
RePEc:edi:frbchus (more details at EDIRC)

(25%) Economic Research Department
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Chicago, Illinois (United States)
https://www.chicagofed.org/research/index

: 312/322-5322
312/322-5515
P.O. Box 834, Chicago, Illinois 60690
RePEc:edi:rfrbcus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jonas D. M. Fisher & Ryan Peters, 2009. "Using stock returns to identify government spending shocks," Working Paper Series WP-09-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

Articles

  1. Peters, Ryan H. & Taylor, Lucian A., 2017. "Intangible capital and the investment-q relation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(2), pages 251-272.
  2. JonasD.M. Fisher & Ryan Peters, 2010. "Using Stock Returns to Identify Government Spending Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(544), pages 414-436, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jonas D. M. Fisher & Ryan Peters, 2009. "Using stock returns to identify government spending shocks," Working Paper Series WP-09-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

    Cited by:

    1. Valerie A. Ramey, 2012. "Government Spending and Private Activity," NBER Chapters,in: Fiscal Policy after the Financial Crisis, pages 19-55 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Fernando Broner & Daragh Clancy & Alberto Martin & Aitor Erce, 2017. "Fiscal multipliers and foreign holdings of public debt," Economics Working Papers 1610, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    3. Patrick F?ve & Julien Matheron & Jean-Guillaume Sahuc, 2013. "A Pitfall with Estimated DSGE-Based Government Spending Multipliers," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 141-178, October.
    4. Nadav Ben Zeev & Evi Pappa, 2017. "Chronicle of a War Foretold: The Macroeconomic Effects of Anticipated Defence Spending Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(603), pages 1568-1597, August.
    5. Anna Kormilitsina, 2016. "Is Government Spending Predetermined? A Test of Identification for Fiscal Policy Shocks," Departmental Working Papers 1607, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.
    6. Fieldhouse, Andrew & Mertens, Karel & Ravn, Morten O, 2017. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Government Asset Purchases: Evidence from Postwar US Housing Credit Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 11830, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Hiroshi Morita, 2012. "Expansionary Effect of an Anticipated Fiscal Policy on Consumption in Japan," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd11-219, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    8. Ethan Ilzetzki & Enrique G. Mendoza & Carlos A. Végh, 2010. "How Big (Small?) are Fiscal Multipliers?," CEP Discussion Papers dp1016, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    9. Erceg, Christopher & Lindé, Jesper, 2010. "Is There a Fiscal Free Lunch in a Liquidity Trap?," CEPR Discussion Papers 7624, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Lawrence Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Sergio Rebelo, 2009. "When is the government spending multiplier large?," NBER Working Papers 15394, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Forni, Mario & Gambetti, Luca, 2016. "Government spending shocks in open economy VARs," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 68-84.
    12. Anna Kormilitsina & Sarah Zubairy, 2015. "Propagation Mechanisms for Government Spending Shocks: A Bayesian Comparison," EcoMod2015 8646, EcoMod.
    13. Antje Berndt & Hanno Lustig & Sevin Yeltekin, "undated". "How does the U.S. government finance fiscal shocks?," GSIA Working Papers 2006-E70, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
    14. Drautzburg, Thorsten, 2016. "A narrative approach to a fiscal DSGE model," Working Papers 16-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    15. Eric M. Leeper & Alexander W. Richter & Todd B. Walker, 2010. "Quantitative Effects of Fiscal Foresight," NBER Working Papers 16363, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Morten Ravn & Karel Mertens, 2012. "The Dynamic Effects of Personal and Corporate Income Tax Changes in the United States," 2012 Meeting Papers 638, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    17. Eric M. Leeper & Todd B. Walker & Shu-Chun Susan Yang, 2009. "Fiscal Foresight and Information Flows," NBER Working Papers 14630, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Valerie A. Ramey, 2016. "Macroeconomic Shocks and Their Propagation," NBER Working Papers 21978, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Thuy Lan Nguyen & Dmitriy Sergeyev & Wataru Miyamoto, 2016. "Government Spending Multipliers under the Zero Lower Bound: Evidence from Japan," 2016 Meeting Papers 666, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    20. Sylvain Leduc & Daniel Wilson, 2013. "Roads to Prosperity or Bridges to Nowhere? Theory and Evidence on the Impact of Public Infrastructure Investment," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 89-142.
    21. Jordan Roulleau-Pasdeloup, 2016. "The Government Spending Multiplier in a Deep Recession," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 16.22, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    22. Pontus Rendahl, 2014. "Fiscal Policy in an Unemployment Crisis," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1405, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    23. Valerie A. Ramey, 2011. "Can Government Purchases Stimulate the Economy?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 673-685, September.
    24. Antonio Acconcia & Giancarlo Corsetti & Saverio Simonelli, 2011. "Mafia and Public Spending: Evidence on the Fiscal Multiplier from a Quasi-experiment," CSEF Working Papers 281, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 04 Feb 2013.
    25. Alan J Auerbach & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2016. "Effects of Fiscal Shocks in a Globalized World," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 64(1), pages 177-215, May.
    26. Hory, Marie-Pierre, 2016. "Fiscal multipliers in Emerging Market Economies: Can we learn something from Advanced Economies?," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 59-84.
    27. Mertens, Karel & Ravn, Morten O., 2014. "A reconciliation of SVAR and narrative estimates of tax multipliers," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(S), pages 1-19.
    28. Fève, Patrick & Matheron, Julien & Sahuc, Jean-Guillaume, 2012. "A Pitfall with DSGE-Based, Estimated, Government Spending Multipliers," IDEI Working Papers 708, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
    29. Murphy, Daniel P., 2013. "How does government spending stimulate consumption?," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 157, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    30. Hafedh Bouakez & Foued Chihi & Michel Normandin, 2010. "Measuring the Effects of Fiscal Policy," Cahiers de recherche 1016, CIRPEE.
    31. Romer, David, 2012. "What Have We Learned about Fiscal Policy from the Crisis?," MIT Press Book Chapters,in: In the Wake of the Crisis: Leading Economists Reassess Economic Policy, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 6, pages 57-66 The MIT Press.
    32. Sebastian Gechert, 2015. "What fiscal policy is most effective? A meta-regression analysis," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 553-580.
    33. Michele Piffer & Maximilian Podstawski, 2017. "Identifying Uncertainty Shocks Using the Price of Gold," CESifo Working Paper Series 6327, CESifo Group Munich.
    34. Aart Kraay, 2014. "Government Spending Multipliers in Developing Countries: Evidence from Lending by Official Creditors," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 170-208, October.
    35. Alan S. Blinder & Mark W. Watson, 2016. "Presidents and the US Economy: An Econometric Exploration," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(4), pages 1015-1045, April.
    36. Bin Chen & Jinho Choi & Juan Carlos Escanciano, 2015. "Testing for Fundamental Vector Moving Average Representations," Caepr Working Papers 2015-022 Classification-C, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
    37. Karel Mertens & Morten Ravn, 2011. "The Research Agenda: Karel Mertens and Morten Ravn on Fiscal Policy, Anticipation Effects, Expectations and Crisis," EconomicDynamics Newsletter, Review of Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(2), April.
    38. Young, Alwyn, 2014. "Structural transformation, the mismeasurement of productivity growth, and the cost disease of services," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60213, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    39. Chang, Andrew C. & Li, Phillip, 2015. "Is Economics Research Replicable? Sixty Published Papers from Thirteen Journals Say "Usually Not"," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-83, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    40. Charles Olivier Mao Takongmo, 2017. "Government-spending multipliers and the zero lower bound in an open economy," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(5), pages 1046-1077, November.
    41. Tommaso Ferraresi & Andrea Roventini & Giorgio Fagiolo, 2015. "Fiscal Policies and Credit Regimes: A TVAR Approach," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(7), pages 1047-1072, November.
    42. Riera-Crichton, Daniel & Vegh, Carlos A. & Vuletin, Guillermo, 2016. "Tax multipliers: Pitfalls in measurement and identification," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 30-48.
    43. Eddie Gerba & Klemens Hauzenberger, 2013. "Estimating US Fiscal and Monetary Interactions in a Time Varying VAR," Studies in Economics 1303, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    44. Nooman Rebei, 2017. "Evaluating Changes in the Transmission Mechanism of Government Spending Shocks," IMF Working Papers 17/49, International Monetary Fund.
    45. Jonathan A. Parker, 2011. "On Measuring the Effects of Fiscal Policy in Recessions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 703-718, September.
    46. Daniel Murphy, 2015. "How Can Government Spending Stimulate Consumption?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(3), pages 551-574, July.
    47. Kriwoluzky, Alexander, 2012. "Pre-announcement and timing: The effects of a government expenditure shock," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 373-388.
    48. Morita, Hiroshi, 2015. "State-dependent effects of fiscal policy in Japan: Do rule-of-thumb households increase the effects of fiscal policy?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 49-61.
    49. Ellahie, Atif & Ricco, Giovanni, 2017. "Government Purchases Reloaded : Informational Insufficiency and Heterogeneity in Fiscal VARs," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1138, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    50. Belo, Frederico & Gala, Vito D. & Li, Jun, 2013. "Government spending, political cycles, and the cross section of stock returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 305-324.
    51. Ricco, Giovanni & Ellahie, Atif, 2012. "Government Spending Reloaded: Fundamentalness and Heterogeneity in Fiscal SVARs," MPRA Paper 42105, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    52. Dupor, Bill & Li, Rong, 2015. "The expected inflation channel of government spending in the postwar U.S," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 36-56.
    53. Valerie A. Ramey, 2009. "Identifying Government Spending Shocks: It's All in the Timing," NBER Working Papers 15464, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    54. Sheremirov, Viacheslav & Spirovska, Sandra, 2015. "Output response to government spending: evidence from new international military spending data," Working Papers 15-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    55. Favero, Carlo A. & Karamysheva, Madina, 2015. "What Do We Know About Fiscal Multipliers?," CEPR Discussion Papers 10986, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    56. Nelimarkka, Jaakko, 2017. "The effects of government spending under anticipation: the noncausal VAR approach," MPRA Paper 81303, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    57. Hjelm, Göran & Stockhammar, Pär, 2016. "Short Run Effects of Fiscal Policy on GDP and Employment: Swedish Evidence," Working Papers 147, National Institute of Economic Research.
    58. Valerie A. Ramey & Sarah Zubairy, 2018. "Government Spending Multipliers in Good Times and in Bad: Evidence from US Historical Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 126(2), pages 850-901.
    59. Sebastian Gechert & Ansgar Rannenberg, 2014. "Are Fiscal Multipliers Regime-Dependent? A Meta Regression Analysis," IMK Working Paper 139-2014, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    60. Jun-Hyung Ko & Hiroshi Morita, 2013. "Regime Switches in Japanese Fiscal Policy: Markov-Switching VAR Approach," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd12-270, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    61. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 2014. "Transfer Payments and the Macroeconomy: The Effects of Social Security Benefit Changes, 1952-1991," NBER Working Papers 20087, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    62. Barnichon, Régis & Matthes, Christian, 2016. "Understanding the Size of the Government Spending Multiplier: It's in the Sign," CEPR Discussion Papers 11373, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    63. Emi Nakamura & J?n Steinsson, 2014. "Fiscal Stimulus in a Monetary Union: Evidence from US Regions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(3), pages 753-792, March.
    64. Firth, Michael & Gong, Stephen X. & Shan, Liwei, 2013. "Cost of government and firm value," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 136-152.
    65. Young, Alwyn, 2013. "Structural transformation, the mismeasurement of productivity growth and the cost disease of services," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 54247, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    66. KLEIN, Mathias & WINKLER, Roland, 2018. "The government spending multiplier at the zero lower bound: International evidence from historical data," Working Papers 2018001, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics.
    67. Felix Reichling & Charles Whalen, 2012. "Assessing the Short-Term Effects on Output of Changes in Federal Fiscal Policies: Working Paper 2012-08," Working Papers 43278, Congressional Budget Office.
    68. Etsuro Shioji, 2017. "Extracting fiscal policy expectations from a cross section of daily stock returns," UTokyo Price Project Working Paper Series 077, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.
    69. Soyoung Kim, 2013. "Vector autoregressive models for macroeconomic policy analysis," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Empirical Macroeconomics, chapter 23, pages 555-572 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    70. Hiroshi Morita, 2017. "Effects of Anticipated Fiscal Policy Shock on Macroeconomic Dynamics in Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 68(3), pages 364-393, September.
    71. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2012. "Disentangling the Channels of the 2007-2009 Recession," NBER Working Papers 18094, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Peters, Ryan H. & Taylor, Lucian A., 2017. "Intangible capital and the investment-q relation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(2), pages 251-272.

    Cited by:

    1. Devonald, L. & Higson, C. & Holly, S., 2017. "Aggregate and Firm level volatility: the role of acquisitions and disposals," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1748, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Du, Qianqian & Shen, Rui, 2018. "Peer performance and earnings management," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 125-137.
    3. Juha Kilponen & Fabio Verona, 2017. "Testing the Q theory of investment in the frequency domain," CEF.UP Working Papers 1701, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    4. Hasan, Mostafa Monzur & Cheung, Adrian (Wai-Kong), 2018. "Organization capital and firm life cycle," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 556-578.
    5. Gu, Tiantian, 2017. "U.S. multinationals and cash holdings," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 125(2), pages 344-368.
    6. Coldbeck, Beata & Ozkan, Aydin, 2018. "Comparison of adjustment speeds in target research and development and capital investment: What did the financial crisis of 2007 change?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 1-10.
    7. Robin Döttling & Tomislav Ladika & Enrico Perotti, 2016. "The (Self-)Funding of Intangibles," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 16-093/IV, Tinbergen Institute.
    8. Mindy X. Zhang & Qi Sun, 2016. "Financing Intangible Capital," 2016 Meeting Papers 230, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Lewis Alexander & Janice Eberly, 2018. "Investment Hollowing Out," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 66(1), pages 5-30, March.
    10. Jules H. van Binsbergen & Christian C. Opp, 2017. "Real Anomalies," NBER Working Papers 23238, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Germán Gutiérrez & Thomas Philippon, 2017. "Declining Competition and Investment in the U.S," NBER Working Papers 23583, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Sinem Celik Girgin & Thanasis Karlis & Hong-Oanh Nguyen, 2018. "A Critical Review of the Literature on Firm-Level Theories on Ship Investment," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(1), pages 1-19, January.
    13. Gianpaolo Parise & Fabrizio Leone, 2018. "Family first? Nepotism and corporate investment," BIS Working Papers 693, Bank for International Settlements.
    14. Verona, Fabio, 2017. "Q, investment, and the financial cycle," Research Discussion Papers 26/2017, Bank of Finland.

  2. JonasD.M. Fisher & Ryan Peters, 2010. "Using Stock Returns to Identify Government Spending Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(544), pages 414-436, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. No paper was announced in a field specific NEP report

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