IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this book

Sustainable Prosperity in the New Economy? Business Organization and High-Tech Employment in the United States


  • William Lazonick

    (University of Massachusetts-Lowell)


Lazonick explains the origins of the new era of employment insecurity and income inequality, and considers what governments, businesses, and individuals can do about it. He also asks whether the United States can refashion its high-tech business model to generate stable and equitable economic growth and explores the institutional and organizational conditions under which an advance economy - not only the U.S. economy - can achieve sustainable prosperity.

Suggested Citation

  • William Lazonick, 2009. "Sustainable Prosperity in the New Economy? Business Organization and High-Tech Employment in the United States," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number spne, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:spne Note: PDF is the book's first chapter.

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: All books are copyrighted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alicia H. Munnell & Steven A. Sass, 2007. "The Labor Supply of Older Americans," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2007-12, Center for Retirement Research, revised Jun 2007.
    2. Henry S. Farber, 2007. "Job Loss and the Decline in Job Security in the United States," Working Papers 1041, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    3. Henry S. Farber, 2007. "Job Loss and the Decline in Job Security in the United States," Working Papers 1041, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Olivier Brossard & Stéphanie Lavigne & Mustafa Erdem Sakinç, 2013. "Ownership structures and R&D in Europe: the good institutional investors, the bad and ugly impatient shareholders," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 1031-1068, August.
    2. Zehavi, Amos & Breznitz, Dan, 2017. "Distribution sensitive innovation policies: Conceptualization and empirical examples," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 327-336.
    3. Leila E. Davis, 2013. "Financialization and the nonfinancial corporation: an investigation of firmlevel investment behavior in the U.S., 1971-2011," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2013-08, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    4. Lazonick, William & Tulum, Öner, 2011. "US biopharmaceutical finance and the sustainability of the biotech business model," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1170-1187.
    5. Mariana Mazzucato & L. Randall Wray, 2015. "Financing the Capital Development of the Economy: A Keynes-Schumpeter-Minsky Synthesis," LEM Papers Series 2015/14, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    6. Alan Hughes, 2014. "Short-Termism, Impatient Capital and Finance for Manufacturing Innovation in the UK," Working Papers wp457, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    7. Lechevalier, Sébastien & Nishimura, Junichi & Storz, Cornelia, 2014. "Diversity in patterns of industry evolution: How an intrapreneurial regime contributed to the emergence of the service robot industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(10), pages 1716-1729.
    8. Veneziani, Roberto & Yoshihara, Naoki, 2016. "The Theory of Exploitation as the Unequal Exchange of Labour," Discussion Paper Series 652, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    9. Daniel Kuehn & Hal Salzman, 2017. "The Engineering Labor Market: An Overview of Recent Trends," NBER Chapters,in: U.S. Engineering in a Global Economy National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Clarke Thomas, 2013. "Deconstructing the Mythology of Shareholder Value: A Comment on Lynn Stout’s “The Shareholder Value Myth”," Accounting, Economics, and Law: A Convivium, De Gruyter, vol. 3(1), pages 15-42, January.

    More about this item


    sustainable prosperity; income inequality; high-tech industry; high-tech labor force; stock options; stock buy-backs; silicon Valley; pensions; layoffs;

    JEL classification:

    • L2 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • P1 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:spne. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.