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How Do We Spend Our Time? Evidence from the American Time Use Survey

Editor

Listed:
  • Jean Kimmel
    (Western Michigan University)

Abstract

This book presents findings based on the American Time Use Survey. This new data set allows the contributors to determine how Americans spend their time, providing a better understanding of everyday life.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean Kimmel (ed.), 2008. "How Do We Spend Our Time? Evidence from the American Time Use Survey," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number hwst.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:hwst Note: PDF is the book's first chapter.
    as

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    File URL: http://research.upjohn.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1238&context=up_bookchapters
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Katharine G. Abraham & Susan N. Houseman, 2008. "Removing Barriers to Work for Older Americans," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers,in: Timothy J. Bartik & Susan N. Houseman (ed.), A Future of Good Jobs? America's Challenge in the Global Economy, chapter 5, pages 161-202 W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    2. Henry S. Farber, 2005. "What do we know about Job Loss in the United States? Evidence from the Displaced Workers Survey, 1984-2004," Working Papers 877, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    3. Dew-Becker, Ian & Gordon, Robert J, 2005. "Where did the Productivity Growth Go? Inflation Dynamics and the Distribution of Income," CEPR Discussion Papers 5419, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Ian Dew-Becker & Robert J. Gordon, 2005. "Where Did Productivity Growth Go? Inflation Dynamics and the Distribution of Income," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, pages 67-150.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ATUS; time use; household consumption; household production; work hours;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J29 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Other

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