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Caring for older Australians

Author

Listed:
  • Commission, Productivity

    () (Productivity Commission)

Abstract

The Productivity Commission inquiry report, released 8 August 2011, recommends a major overhaul of Australia’s aged care system to improve the wellbeing of older Australians and meet the challenges of an ageing population. Over one million older Australians receive aged care services. The range and quality of these services have improved over past decades, but more needs to be done. Future challenges include the increasing numbers and expectations of older people, a relative fall in the number of informal carers, and the need for more workers. By 2050, over 3.5 million Australians are expected to use aged care services each year. The aged care system suffers key weaknesses. It is difficult to navigate. Services are limited, as is consumer choice. Quality is variable. Coverage of needs, pricing, subsidies and user co-contributions are inconsistent or inequitable. Workforce shortages are exacerbated by low wages and some workers have insufficient skills. The Commission’s proposals address these weaknesses and challenges and aim to deliver higher quality care. The focus is on the wellbeing of older Australians — promoting their independence, giving them choice and retaining their community engagement. The overview booklet contains the key points, and an extensive summary of the Commission's analysis and recommendations. For the detailed supporting material, please view the full report from the Commission’s website.

Suggested Citation

  • Commission, Productivity, 2011. "Caring for older Australians," Inquiry Reports, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia, number 53.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:prodir:0053
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    File URL: http://www.pc.gov.au/projects/inquiry/aged-care/report
    File Function: Publication website
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Prosser, Brenton & Davey, Rachel & Gibson, Diane, 2015. "Progress in centralised ethics review processes: Implications for multi-site health evaluations," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 117-123.
    2. Huw Brokensha & Andrew Taylor & Tony Barnes, 2017. "Changing Australia’s Age Pension Qualification Age: Modelling Differential Effects by Race," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(2), pages 203-229, April.
    3. Katja Hanewald & Michael Sherris, 2013. "Postcode-Level House Price Models for Banking and Insurance Applications," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(286), pages 411-425, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    aged care; aged care system; aged care workers; aged care services; Australia’s population; geriatric care; palliative care; residential and community aged care; aged care providers; aged care sector;

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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