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Rethinking Economic Development, Growth, and Institutions

Author

Listed:
  • Ros, Jaime

    (Professor of Economics, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) and Professor Emeritus, University of Notre Dame)

Abstract

Why are some countries richer than others? Why do some economies grow so much faster than others do? Do economies tend to converge to similar levels of per capita income? Or is catching up simply impossible? If modern technology has shown the potential to raise living standards to first-world levels, why is it that the vast majority of the world's population lives in poverty in underdeveloped countries? These questions have been at the heart of development economics since its inception several decades ago and are now at the center of the research agenda of the modern economics of growth. This book reviews the answers to these questions in the contemporary fields of growth theory and comparative development. It is a sequel to Development Theory and the Economics of Growth published in 2000 with the aim to vindicate the theoretical insights and accumulated empirical knowledge of classical development economics and to integrate them into the mainstream of modern growth economics. The growth and development fields have expanded in the last twelve years in welcome directions that aim to deepen our understanding of the fundamental determinants of comparative development. This new book evaluates these new directions, including developments in endogenous growth theory and economic geography as well as the rise and challenge of the new institutional economics, in the light of the earlier, classical contributions to development theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Ros, Jaime, 2013. "Rethinking Economic Development, Growth, and Institutions," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199684816.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780199684816
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:streco:v:47:y:2018:i:c:p:96-113 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Thomas von Brasch, 2015. "The Norwegian productivity puzzle - not so puzzling after all?," Discussion Papers 796, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    3. Arturo Martinez Jr. & Mark Western & Michele Haynes & Wojtek Tomaszewski, 2015. "How Income Segmentation Affects Income Mobility: Evidence from Panel Data in the Philippines," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(3), pages 590-608, September.
    4. Carlos A. Ibarra, 2016. "Investment, asset market, and the relative unit labor cost in Mexico," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 49(4), pages 339-364, November.
    5. Skott, Peter & Gómez-Ramírez, Leopoldo, 2018. "Credit constraints and economic growth in a dual economy," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 64-76.
    6. Frenkel, Roberto & Rapetti, Martin, 2014. "The real exchange rate as a target of macroeconomic policy," MPRA Paper 59335, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Carlos A. Ibarra & Robert A. Blecker, 2016. "Structural change, the real exchange rate and the balance of payments in Mexico, 1960–2012," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 507-539.
    8. Mendez-Guerra, Carlos, 2017. "Labor productivity, capital accumulation, and aggregate efficiency across countries: Some stylized facts," MPRA Paper 82461, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. repec:tei:journl:v:10:y:2017:i:3:p:80-89 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Carlos A. Ibarra & Jaime Ros, 2017. "The decline of the labour share in Mexico: 1990–2015," WIDER Working Paper Series 183, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. repec:cmj:seapas:y:2017:i:13:p:109-125 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:bla:metroe:v:68:y:2017:i:3:p:549-583 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Marwil J. Dávila-Fernández & Serena Sordi, 2018. "Path dependence, distributive cycles and export capacity in a BoPC growth model," Department of Economics University of Siena 785, Department of Economics, University of Siena.

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