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Modelling the Middle Ages: The History and Theory of England's Economic Development

Author

Listed:
  • Hatcher, John

    (Corpus Christi College, Cambridge)

  • Bailey, Mark

Abstract

Most of what has been written on the economy of the middle ages is deeply influenced by abstract concepts and theories. The most powerful and popular of these guiding beliefs are derived from intellectual foundations laid down in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries by Adam Smith, Johan von Thunen, Thomas Malthus, David Ricardo, and Karl Marx. In the hands of twentieth-century historians and social scientists these venerable ideas have been moulded into three grand explanatory ideas which continue to dominate interpretations of economic development. These trumpet in turn the claims of 'commercialization', 'population and resources', or 'class power and property relations' as the prime movers of historical change. In this highly original book John Hatcher and Mark Bailey examine the structure and test the validity of these conflicting models from a variety of perspectives. In the course of their investigations they provide not only detailed reconstructions of the economic history of England in the middle ages and sustained critical commentaries on the work of leading historians, but also discussions of the philosophy and methods of history and the social sciences. The result is a short and readily intelligible introduction to medieval economic history, an up-to-date critique of established models, and a succinct treatise on historiographical method.

Suggested Citation

  • Hatcher, John & Bailey, Mark, 2001. "Modelling the Middle Ages: The History and Theory of England's Economic Development," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199244126.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780199244126
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bruce M. S. Campbell, 2010. "Nature as historical protagonist: environment and society in pre-industrial England," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(2), pages 281-314, May.
    2. A. T. Brown, 2014. "Estate management and institutional constraints in pre-industrial England: the ecclesiastical estates of Durham, c. 1400–1640," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(3), pages 699-719, August.
    3. Alexander Klein & Sheilagh Ogilvie, 2017. "Was Domar Right? Serfdom and Factor Endowments in Bohemia," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 344, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    4. Eric B. Schneider, 2011. "Evaluating the Effectiveness of Yield-Raising Strategies in Medieval England: An Econometric Approach," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _090, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    5. Guido Alfani, 2015. "Famines in late Medieval and Early Modern Italy: A test for an advanced economy," Working Papers 082, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    6. Mark Bailey, 2009. "Villeinage in England: a regional case study, c.1250-c.1349 -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(2), pages 430-457, May.
    7. Leonardo Ridolfi, 2017. "L'histoire immobile? Six centuries of real wages in France from Louis IX to Napoleon III: 1250-1860," LEM Papers Series 2017/14, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    8. Jean-Paul Chavas & Daniel W. Bromley, 2005. "Modelling Population and Resource Scarcity in Fourteenth-century England," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(2), pages 217-237.
    9. Robert C. Allen, 2008. "A Review of Gregory Clark's A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(4), pages 946-973, December.
    10. Pamela Nightingale, 2010. "Gold, credit, and mortality: distinguishing deflationary pressures on the late medieval English economy," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(4), pages 1081-1104, November.
    11. Boerner, Lars & Volckart, Oliver, 2011. "The utility of a common coinage: Currency unions and the integration of money markets in late Medieval Central Europe," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 53-65, January.
    12. Broadberry, Stephen & Gardner, Leigh, 2014. "African economic growth in a European mirror: a historical perspective," Economic History Working Papers 56493, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    13. David Stone, 2014. "The impact of drought in early fourteenth-century England," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(2), pages 435-462, May.
    14. Stephen H. Rigby, 2010. "Urban population in late medieval England: the evidence of the lay subsidies," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(2), pages 393-417, May.
    15. Bruce M. S. Campbell, 2008. "Benchmarking medieval economic development: England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, c.1290 -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(4), pages 896-945, November.
    16. Cliff T. Bekar and Clyde Reed, 2009. "Risk, Asset Markets and Inequality: Evidence from Medieval England," Economics Series Working Papers Number 79, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    17. Martin Allen, 2011. "Silver production and the money supply in England and Wales, 1086–c.1500," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(1), pages 114-131, February.

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