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Changing Inequalities in Rich Countries: Analytical and Comparative Perspectives

Editor

Listed:
  • Salverda, Wiemer
    (Amsterdam Center for Inequality Studies AMCIS, and Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies AIAS, University of Amsterdam)

  • Nolan, Brian
    (Director of Employment, Equity and Growth and Professor of Social Policy, Institute for New Economic Thinking, Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford)

  • Checchi, Daniele
    (University of Milan)

  • Marx, Ive
    (University of Antwerp)

  • McKnight, Abigail
    (Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics)

  • Toth, Istvan Gyorgy
    (Tarki Social Research Institute Budapest)

  • van de Werfhorst, Herman
    (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

There has been a remarkable upsurge of debate about increasing inequalities and their societal implications, reinforced by the economic crisis but bubbling to the surface before it. This has been seen in popular discourse, media coverage, political debate, and research in the social sciences. The central questions addressed by this book, and the major research project GINI on which it is based, are: - Have inequalities in income, wealth and education increased over the past 30 years or so across the rich countries, and if so why? - What are the social, cultural and political impacts of increasing inequalities in income, wealth and education? - What are the implications for policy and for the future development of welfare states? In seeking to answer these questions, this book adopts an interdisciplinary approach that draws on economics, sociology, and political science, and applies this approach to learning from the experiences over the last three decades of European countries together with the USA, Japan, Canada, Australia, and South Korea. It combines comparative research with lessons from specific country experiences, and highlights the challenges in seeking to adequately assess the factors underpinning increasing inequalities and to identify the channels through which these may impact on key social and political outcomes, as well as the importance of framing inequality trends and impacts in the institutional and policy context of the country in question. Contributors to this volume - Robert Andersen, University of Toronto Gabriele Ballarino, University of Milan Francesco Bogliacino, Universidad Konrad Lorenz Michela Braga, University of Milan Massimiliano Bratti, University of Milan Brian Burgoon, University of Amsterdam Daniele Checchi, University of Milan Frank Cowell, London School of Economics Antonio Filippin, University of Milan Carlo Fiorio, University of Milan Christina Haas, University of Amsterdam Daniel Horn, European University Institute Marco Leonardi, University of Milan Abigail McKnight, London School of Economics Virginia Maestri, University of Amsterdam Ive Marx, University of Antwerp Marton Medgyesi, Tarki Social Research Institute Elena Meschi, Ca' Foscari University of Venice Brian Nolan, University College Dublin Wiemer Salverda, University of Amsterdam Francesco Scervini, University of Milan Istvan Gyorgy Toth, Tarki Social Research Institute Herman G. van de Werfhorst, University of Amsterdam Tim van Rie, University of Antwerp Chris Whelan, University College Dublin

Suggested Citation

  • Salverda, Wiemer & Nolan, Brian & Checchi, Daniele & Marx, Ive & McKnight, Abigail & Toth, Istvan Gy (ed.), 2016. "Changing Inequalities in Rich Countries: Analytical and Comparative Perspectives," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198784395.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780198784395
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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