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Trade and Jobs in Europe: Much Ado About Nothing?


  • Dewatripont, Mathias
  • Sapir, Andre
  • Sekkat, Khalid
    (all at the Universite Libre de Bruxelles)


In the last 25 years, Europe has experienced a reduction in growth and an explosion in unemployment. At a time when this and the continuing existence of the welfare state are top of the European agenda, it has become increasingly popular to blame the globalization of the world economy for current problems. This book provides the first comprehensive set of studies on the impact of trade with developing countries on the European labour market. It argues that the evidence does not point to trade with developing countries as a major cause of European unemployment. Instead, technological change and domestic policy choices are the main causal factors. As a result, the contributors argue against protectionist trade polices, whose benefits to employment would be limited at best, but whose risk to world growth due to trade wars is immense. The next ten years are a critical period for European integration and expansion: Trade and Jobs in Europe will be of crucial importance to all those at the heart of the current debate: advisers, policy-makers, and researchers alike.

Suggested Citation

  • Dewatripont, Mathias & Sapir, Andre & Sekkat, Khalid (ed.), 1999. "Trade and Jobs in Europe: Much Ado About Nothing?," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198293606.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780198293606

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gordon,Robert J., 2004. "Productivity Growth, Inflation, and Unemployment," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521531429, March.
    2. Dale W. Jorgenson, 2001. "Information Technology and the U.S. Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 1-32, March.
    3. Gordon,Robert J., 2004. "Productivity Growth, Inflation, and Unemployment," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521800082, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Novella Bottini & Michael Gasiorek, 2009. "Trade and Job Reallocation: Evidence for Morocco," Working Papers 492, Economic Research Forum, revised Jun 2009.
    2. Dumont, Michel, 2004. "The Impact of International Trade with Newly Industrialised Countries on the Wages and Employment of Low-Skilled and High-Skilled Workers in the European Union," MPRA Paper 83525, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Sapir, André, 2000. "Who is Afraid of Globalization? The Challenge of Domestic Adjustment in Europe and America," CEPR Discussion Papers 2595, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Lahcen ACHY & Khalid SEKKAT, 2005. "Trade Liberalization and Employment in the Moroccan Manufacturing Sector," International Trade 0512011, EconWPA.
    5. Peter Huber & Yvonne Wolfmayr-Schnitzer, 2000. "Foreign Trade and Wages," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 73(3), pages 197-210, March.

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