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Confronting the Coffee Crisis: Fair Trade, Sustainable Livelihoods and Ecosystems in Mexico and Central America

  • Christopher M. Bacon
    ()

    (University of California, Berkeley)

  • V. Ernesto Méndez
    ()

    (University of Vermont)

  • Stephen R. Gliessman
    ()

    (University of California, Santa Cruz)

  • David Goodman
    ()

    (University of California, Santa Cruz)

  • Jonathan A. Fox
    ()

    (University of California, Santa Cruz)

Our morning cups of coffee connect us to a global industry and an export crisis in the tropics that is destroying livelihoods, undermining the cohesion of families and communities, and threatening ecosystems. Confronting the Coffee Crisis explores small-scale farming, the political economy of the global coffee industry, and initiatives that claim to promote more sustainable rural development in coffee-producing communities. Contributors review the historical, political, economic, and agroecological processes within today's coffee industry and analyze the severely depressed export market that faces small-scale growers in Mexico and Central America. The book presents a series of interdisciplinary, empirically rich case studies showing how small-scale farmers manage ecosystems and organize collectively as they seek useful collaborations with international NGOs and coffee companies to create opportunities for themselves in the coffee market. The findings demonstrate the interconnections among farmer livelihoods, biodiversity, conservation, and changing coffee markets. Additional chapters examine alternative trade practices, certification, and eco-labeling, discussing the politics and market growth of organic, shade-grown, and Fair Trade coffees. Combining interdisciplinary research with case-study analysis at scales ranging from the local to the global, Confronting the Coffee Crisis reveals the promise and the perils of efforts to create a more sustainable coffee industry.

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This book is provided by The MIT Press in its series MIT Press Books with number 026252480 and published in 2008.
Volume: 1
Edition: 1
ISBN: 0-262-52480-5
Handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:026252480
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu

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