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Forced Saving

Author

Listed:
  • Bateman,Hazel
  • Kingston,Geoffrey
  • Piggott,John

Abstract

Forced Saving, first published in 2001, offers an analysis of pension policy from an economic perspective. It begins with an overview of the problem of population ageing around the world, and then provides a framework within which policy responses may be consistently assessed. It focuses on the 'mandating' approach to retirement income policy, in which governments are compelling individuals - or their employers - to take on this responsibility, at least in part. The role of government becomes limited to one of mandating contributions from wages, along with regulating private fund managers to a greater or lesser extent. The authors explore the implications of introducing such a policy reform. They argue that while there is no universal agreement on the relative costs and benefits of this policy approach, there are often some advantages to moving at least some distance down the mandating path.

Suggested Citation

  • Bateman,Hazel & Kingston,Geoffrey & Piggott,John, 2001. "Forced Saving," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521481625, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521481625
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    • Bateman,Hazel & Kingston,Geoffrey & Piggott,John, 2001. "Forced Saving," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521484718, April.

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jacob Bikker & Jan de Dreu, 2006. "Pension fund efficiency: the impact of scale, governance and plan design," DNB Working Papers 109, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. Hazel Bateman & Susan Thorp, 2008. "Choices and Constraints over Retirement Income Streams: Comparing Rules and Regulations," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(s1), pages 17-31, September.
    3. Rafal Chomik & John Piggott, 2012. "Pensions, Ageing and Retirement in Australia: Long-Term Projections and Policies," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(3), pages 350-361, September.
    4. Mitchell, Olivia S. & Piggott, John, 2004. "Unlocking housing equity in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 466-505, December.
    5. Andersen, Torben M. & Bhattacharya, Joydeep, 2016. "Why mandate young borrowers to contribute to their retirement accounts?," ISU General Staff Papers 201609260700001016, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Michael E. Drew & Jon D. Stanford, 2003. "A Review of Australia’s Compulsory Superannuation Scheme After a Decade," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 127, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    7. Edward Whitehouse & Richard Disney, 2002. "The Economic Well-Being of Older People in International Perspective: A Critical Review," LIS Working papers 306, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    8. Bateman, Hazel, 2008. "Australia's "lost" superannuation (retirement saving) accounts," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper 393, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    9. Louis Kaplow, 2015. "Government Policy and Labor Supply with Myopic or Targeted Savings Decisions," Tax Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 159-193.
    10. Helen Higgs & Andrew C. Worthington, 2010. "Economies of Scale and Scope in Australian Superannuation Funds," Discussion Papers in Finance finance:201015, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
    11. Disney, Richard & Whitehouse, Edward, 2002. "The economic well-being of older people in international perspective: a critical review," MPRA Paper 10333, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Garry F. Barrett & Yi-Ping Tseng, 2008. "Retirement Saving in Australia," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 34(s1), pages 177-193, November.
    13. Dayoub, Mariam & Lasagabaster, Esperanza, 2008. "General trends in competition policy and investment regulation in mandatory defined contribution markets in Latin America," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4720, The World Bank.
    14. Craig Speelman & Marilyn Clark-Murphy & Paul Gerrans, 2013. "Decision Making Clusters in Retirement Savings: Gender Differences Dominate," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 329-339, September.
    15. Wei-Ting Pan, 2016. "The Impact of Mandatory Savings on Life Cycle Consumption and Portfolio Choice," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 32, June.
    16. Ellis Connolly & Marion Kohler, 2004. "The Impact of Superannuation on Household Saving," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2004-01, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    17. Robert Holzmann & Richard Hinz, 2005. "Old Age Income Support in the 21st century: An International Perspective on Pension Systems and Reform," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7336, July.
    18. Whitehouse, Edward, 2001. "Pension systems in 15 countries compared: the value of entitlements," MPRA Paper 14751, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Louis Kaplow, 2014. "Government Policy and Labor Supply with Myopic or Targeted Savings Decisions," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 29, pages 159-193 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. McDonald, Garry W. & Forgie, Vicky E. & MacGregor, Catherine, 2006. "Treading lightly: Ecofootprints of New Zealand's ageing population," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 424-439, March.
    21. Christa Stewens & Bernd Raffelhüschen & Franz Knieps & Eberhard Wille & Adrian Ottnad & Johann Eekhoff, 2007. "Finanzierbar, sozial und nachhaltig: Wie sollte die Pflegeversicherung reformiert werden?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 60(09), pages 03-24, May.
    22. Therese Jefferson & Alison Preston, 2005. "Australia'S "Other" Gender Wage Gap: Baby Boomers And Compulsory Superannuation Accounts," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 79-101.

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