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Gry komputerowe i branża gier a sztuka komiksowa

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  • Klimczuk, Andrzej

Abstract

Growth in popularity of computer (video) games is a noticeable change in recent years. Electronic entertainment increasingly engages the wider society and reaches to new audiences by offering them satisfy of wide variety of needs and aspirations. As a mass media games not only provide entertainment, but they are also an important source of income, knowledge and social problems. Article aims to bring closer look on the common areas of games and comics. On the one hand designers and artists working on games are often inspired by comic books, as well as they create their licensed adaptations and separate „interactive issues”. On the other hand more and more often we can see comics based on popular games. Study present the areas of agreement, cooperation or dependence like: technologies used to create games and comic books, use of comic books to comment events in the gaming industry and organization of exhibitions or events popularizing the works from both fields.

Suggested Citation

  • Klimczuk, Andrzej, 2011. "Gry komputerowe i branża gier a sztuka komiksowa," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 385-396.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:espost:92373
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    Keywords

    ICT; Ludology; Social Capital; Video Games; Mass media; Stereotypes and Prejudice; Game Concepts; Theory of Network & Participation Culture; serious games; e-learning; User-Generated Content; Technoculture; Comics Arts Education; Comics/Sequential Art; games industry; Leisure Industries;

    JEL classification:

    • Z11 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economics of the Arts and Literature
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media

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