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Fiscal Stimulus With Learning‐By‐Doing

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  • Antonello D'Alessandro
  • Giulio Fella
  • Leonardo Melosi

Abstract

Using a Bayesian structural vector autoregression analysis, we document that an increase in government purchases raises private consumption, the real wage, and total factor productivity (TFP) while reducing inflation. These three facts are hard to reconcile with both neoclassical and New Keynesian models. We extend a standard New Keynesian model to allow for skill accumulation through past work experience. An increase in government spending increases hours and induces skill accumulation and higher measured TFP and real wages in subsequent periods. Future marginal costs fall lowering expected inflation and, through the monetary policy rule, the real interest rate. Consumption increases as a result.

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  • Antonello D'Alessandro & Giulio Fella & Leonardo Melosi, 2019. "Fiscal Stimulus With Learning‐By‐Doing," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 60(3), pages 1413-1432, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:iecrev:v:60:y:2019:i:3:p:1413-1432
    DOI: 10.1111/iere.12391
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    Cited by:

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    2. Görtz, Christoph & Gunn, Christopher & Lubik, Thomas A., 2022. "Is there news in inventories?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 87-104.
    3. Mumtaz, Haroon & Theodoridis, Konstantinos, 2020. "Fiscal policy shocks and stock prices in the United States," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).
    4. Laurent Ferrara & Luca Metelli & Filippo Natoli & Daniele Siena, 2020. "Questioning the puzzle: Fiscal policy, exchange rate and inflation," Working papers 752, Banque de France.
    5. Klein, Mathias & Linnemann, Ludger, 2020. "The time-varying effect of fiscal policy on inflation: Evidence from historical US data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 186(C).
    6. Bredemeier, Christian & Juessen, Falko & Schabert, Andreas, 2022. "Why are fiscal multipliers moderate even under monetary accommodation?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 141(C).
    7. Ferrara, Laurent & Metelli, Luca & Natoli, Filippo & Siena, Daniele, 2021. "Questioning the puzzle: Fiscal policy, real exchange rate and inflation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C).
    8. Sayed O. M. Timuno & Joel Hinaunye Eita & Lanouar Charfeddine, 2020. "Towards an effective fiscal stimulus: Evidence from Botswana," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 1790948-179, January.
    9. Jørgensen, Peter L. & Ravn, Søren H., 2022. "The inflation response to government spending shocks: A fiscal price puzzle?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 141(C).
    10. Mathias Klein & Ludger Linnemann, 2019. "Tax and Spending Shocks in the Open Economy: Are the Deficits Twins?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1821, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    11. Murphy, Daniel & Walsh, Kieran James, 2022. "Government spending and interest rates," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 123(C).
    12. Klein, Mathias & Linnemann, Ludger, 2019. "Tax and spending shocks in the open economy: are the deficits twins?," Working Paper Series 377, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    13. Ilut, Cosmin & Saijo, Hikaru, 2021. "Learning, confidence, and business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 354-376.
    14. Klein, Mathias & Linnemann, Ludger, 2019. "Tax and spending shocks in the open economy: Are the deficits twins?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

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