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Economy-Wide Effects of Forest Policies: A General Equilibrium Assessment from Vietnam


  • Christian M. Dufournaud
  • Michael Jerrett
  • CJohn T. Quinn
  • Virginia Maclaren


Using Vietnam as a case study, we employ an Applied General Equilibrium (AGE) model to test three policy options for managing commercial forestry. Specifically, we examine the impact of an export ban, an increase in the ad valorem royalty by 100%, and an increase of 100% in the export tax. A ban on exports raises domestic capital formation, benefits the domestic consumer, and decreases deforestation. The other two policies have little effect on the utility of the domestic household. The findings demonstrate the need to assess forestry policies in the context of the broader economic structure

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  • Christian M. Dufournaud & Michael Jerrett & CJohn T. Quinn & Virginia Maclaren, 2000. "Economy-Wide Effects of Forest Policies: A General Equilibrium Assessment from Vietnam," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 76(1), pages 15-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:76:y:2000:i:1:p:15-27

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    Cited by:

    1. FRASER Iain & WASCHIK Robert, "undated". "Agricultural Land Retirement for Biodiversity: The Australian Wool Industry," EcoMod2003 330700055, EcoMod.
    2. Iain Fraser & Robert Waschik, 2005. "Agricultural Land Retirement and Slippage: Lessons from an Australian Case Study," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(2).
    3. Banerjee, Onil & Alavalapati, Janaki, 2009. "A computable general equilibrium analysis of forest concessions in Brazil," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 244-252, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q23 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Forestry


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