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Nonparametric Estimates of the Labor-Supply Effects of Negative Income Tax Programs

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  • Ashenfelter, Orley
  • Plant, Mark W

Abstract

This article reports nonparametric estimates of the effect of labor-supply behavior on the payments to families enrolled in the Seattle/Denver Income Maintenance Experiment. The randomized assignment of families to the treatment groups in this experiment was designed to permit the calculation of these nonparametric estimates. However, the nonparametric estimates have never been reported, even though they are easy to construct using a simple weighting procedure. Unfortunately, responses to the data collection instrument (which depended on costly surveys) were not random, and this opens up some ambiguity in the results. Copyright 1990 by University of Chicago Press.

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  • Ashenfelter, Orley & Plant, Mark W, 1990. "Nonparametric Estimates of the Labor-Supply Effects of Negative Income Tax Programs," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages 396-415, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:8:y:1990:i:1:p:s396-415
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    Cited by:

    1. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2010. "The Credibility Revolution in Empirical Economics: How Better Research Design Is Taking the Con out of Econometrics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(2), pages 3-30, Spring.
    2. Joshua Angrist & Philip Oreopoulos & Tyler Williams, 2014. "When Opportunity Knocks, Who Answers?: New Evidence on College Achievement Awards," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(3), pages 572-610.
    3. Aviva Aron-Dine & Liran Einav & Amy Finkelstein, 2013. "The RAND Health Insurance Experiment, Three Decades Later," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(1), pages 197-222, Winter.
    4. Siebert, Horst & Stähler, Frank, 1994. "Sozialtransfer und Arbeitsangebot," Kiel Working Papers 648, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Ioana Marinescu, 2018. "No Strings Attached: The Behavioral Effects of U.S. Unconditional Cash Transfer Programs," NBER Working Papers 24337, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. María Alzúa & Guillermo Cruces & Laura Ripani, 2013. "Welfare programs and labor supply in developing countries: experimental evidence from Latin America," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 1255-1284, October.
    7. Robert Moffitt, 2002. "The role of randomized field trials in social science research: a perspective from evaluations of reforms of social welfare programs," CeMMAP working papers CWP23/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    8. Rebecca M. Blank, 2002. "Evaluating Welfare Reform in the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1105-1166, December.

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