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Finite Sample Bias In Iv Estimation Of Intertemporal Labor Supply Models: Is The Intertemporal Substitution Elasticity Really Small?

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  • Chul-In Lee

Abstract

The empirical literature on intertemporal labor supply behavior documents that the intertemporal elasticity of substitution of labor supply is very low, with a plausible range of zero to 0.2. Drawing upon the literature on the distribution of instrumental variables (IV) estimators, this paper demonstrates that this conventional wisdom is erroneous because it does not take into account the severe finite sample bias in these estimates that arise from weak instruments. This paper adopts several approaches to adjust for the problems induced by these weak instruments. The empirical results show that, when uncorrected for finite sample bias, the two-stage least-squares (2SLS) estimate of the elasticity is essentially zero, as in most of the previous studies, with its valid confidence interval being open-ended, [-∞, +∞]. However, when corrected for finite sample bias, the estimate becomes approximately 0.5 with a much tighter confidence interval. © 2001 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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  • Chul-In Lee, 2001. "Finite Sample Bias In Iv Estimation Of Intertemporal Labor Supply Models: Is The Intertemporal Substitution Elasticity Really Small?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(4), pages 638-646, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:83:y:2001:i:4:p:638-646
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    1. Michelacci, Claudio & Pijoan-Mas, Josep, 2007. "The Effects of Labor Market Conditions on Working Time: the US-EU Experience," CEPR Discussion Papers 6314, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Eva Gutierrez Puigarnau & Jos N. van Ommeren, 2013. "Do rich households live farther away from their workplaces?," CPB Discussion Paper 244, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    3. Felix Reichling & Charles Whalen, 2012. "Review of Estimates of the Frisch Elasticity of Labor Supply: Working Paper 2012-13," Working Papers 43676, Congressional Budget Office.
    4. Bessho, Shun-ichiro & Hayashi, Masayoshi, 2011. "Labor supply response and preferences specification: Estimates for prime-age males in Japan," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 398-411, October.
    5. Blundell, Richard & Francesconi, Marco & van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2011. "Anatomy of Welfare Reform Evaluation: Announcement and Implementation Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 6050, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Richard Blundell & Luigi Pistaferri & Itay Saporta-Eksten, 2016. "Consumption Inequality and Family Labor Supply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(2), pages 387-435, February.
    7. Contreras, Juan & Sinclair, Sven, 2008. "Labor supply response in macroeconomic models: Assessing the empirical validity of the intertemporal labor supply response from a stochastic overlapping generations model with incomplete markets," MPRA Paper 10533, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Canova, Fabio & Lopez-Salido, Jose David & Michelacci, Claudio, 2007. "The Labour Market Effects of Technology Shocks," CEPR Discussion Papers 6365, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Islam Asadul & Smyth Russell, 2012. "The Economic Returns to Good Looks and Risky Sex in the Bangladesh Commercial Sex Market," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, May.
    10. Miles S. Kimball & Matthew D. Shapiro, 2008. "Labor Supply: Are the Income and Substitution Effects Both Large or Both Small?," NBER Working Papers 14208, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Guilhem Bascle, 2008. "Controlling for endogeneity with instrumental variables in strategic management research," Post-Print hal-00576795, HAL.
    12. Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau, Eva & van Ommeren, Jos N., 2010. "Labour supply and commuting," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 82-89, July.
    13. Denvil Duncan & Klara Sabirianova Peter, 2009. "Does Labor Supply Respond to a Flat Tax? Evidence from the Russian Tax Reform," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0906, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    14. Sigouin, Christian, 2004. "Self-enforcing employment contracts and business cycle fluctuations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 339-373, March.
    15. Daniel Aaronson & Eric French, 2009. "The Effects of Progressive Taxation on Labor Supply when Hours and Wages Are Jointly Determined," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(2).
    16. Steven J. Haider & David S. Loughran, 2003. "How Important Are Wages to the Elderly? Evidence from the New Beneficiary Data System and the Social Security Earnings Test," Working Papers wp049, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    17. Claudio Michelacci & Josep Pijoan-Mas, 2012. "Intertemporal Labour Supply with Search Frictions," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(3), pages 899-931.
    18. Charles Whalen & Felix Reichling, 2017. "Estimates of the Frisch Elasticity of Labor Supply: A Review," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 43(1), pages 37-42, January.
    19. Shun-ichiro Bessho & Masayoshi Hayashi, 2005. "The CES utility function, non-linear budget constraints and labor supply : results on prime-age males in Japan," Labor Economics Working Papers 21911, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    20. Eva Gutierrez-i-Puigarnau & Jos van Ommeren, 2009. "Labour Supply and Commuting: Implications for Optimal Road Taxes," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-008/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    21. Juan M. Contreras & Sven H. Sinclair, 2008. "The Labor Supply Response in Macroeconomic Models: Working Paper 2008-07," Working Papers 20141, Congressional Budget Office.
    22. Daniel G. Swaine, 2008. "Estimating the Speed of Convergence in the Neoclassical Growth Model: An MLE Estimation of Structural Parameters Using the Stochastic Neoclassical Growth Model, Time-Series Data, and the Kalman Filter," Working Papers 0810, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    23. Denvil Duncan & Klara Sabirianova Peter, 2010. "Does labour supply respond to a flat tax?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(2), pages 365-404, April.

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