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Bridge to Somewhere: Valuing Auckland's Northern Motorway Extensions


  • Arthur Grimes
  • Yun Liang


We estimate net benefits arising from extensions to Auckland's Northern Motorway since 1991. Population, employment and land values rose substantially near the new exits and to the north of the motorway extension, relative to developments elsewhere. We use changes in land values (controlling for other factors) to measure gross benefits of the extensions, which we compare with project costs to determine the project's benefit: cost ratio (B:C). The B:C is at least 6.3. We discuss the types of net benefit and cost that are included and excluded from these estimates, and contrast our methodology with traditional ex-ante B:C approaches. © 2010 LSE and the University of Bath

Suggested Citation

  • Arthur Grimes & Yun Liang, 2010. "Bridge to Somewhere: Valuing Auckland's Northern Motorway Extensions," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 44(3), pages 287-315, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpe:jtecpo:v:44:y:2010:i:3:p:287-315

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Engel, Eduardo M. R. A. & Galetovic, Alexander & Raddatz, Claudio E., 1999. "Taxes and income distribution in Chile: some unpleasant redistributive arithmetic," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 155-192, June.
    2. Cropper, Maureen & Bhattacharya, Soma, 2007. "Public transport subsidies and affordability in Mumbai, India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4395, The World Bank.
    3. Kristin Komives & Vivien Foster & Jonathan Halpern & Quentin Wodon, 2005. "Water, Electricity, and the Poor : Who Benefits from Utility Subsidies?," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6361, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Arthur Grimes, 2011. "Building Bridges: Treating a New Transport Link as a Real Option," ERSA conference papers ersa11p332, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Arthur Grimes & Eyal Apatov & Larissa Lutchman & Anna Robinson, 2014. "Infrastructure’s Long-Lived Impact on Urban Development: Theory and Empirics," Working Papers 14_11, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    3. Arthur Grimes, 2010. "The Economics of Infrastructure Investment: Beyond Simple Cost Benefit Analysis," Working Papers 10_05, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.

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