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Cycles, determinism and persistence in agent-based games and financial time-series: part II


  • J. B. Satinover
  • D. Sornette


The present article constitutes part II of a series of two reports in which we study the decomposition of synthetic and real financial time-series into a superposition of weighted Hamiltonian cycles on graphs. Part II further analyses the cycle-decomposition method introduced in part I for the Minority Game (MG), the Majority Game (MAJG) and the Dollar Game ($G), in order to gain insight into the ‘illusion of control’ that certain of these games demonstrate, i.e. the fact that the strategies outperform the agents that deploy them. We also illustrate both numerical and analytical methods for extracting cycles from a given time-series and apply the method to a number of different real-world data sets, in conjunction with an analysis of persistence.

Suggested Citation

  • J. B. Satinover & D. Sornette, 2012. "Cycles, determinism and persistence in agent-based games and financial time-series: part II," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(7), pages 1065-1078, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:quantf:v:12:y:2012:i:7:p:1065-1078 DOI: 10.1080/14697688.2012.670261

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. B. Tóth & F. Lillo & J. D. Farmer, 2010. "Segmentation algorithm for non-stationary compound Poisson processes," The European Physical Journal B: Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, Springer;EDP Sciences, vol. 78(2), pages 235-243, November.
    2. Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Yuval Gefen & Marc Potters & Matthieu Wyart, 2003. "Fluctuations and response in financial markets: the subtle nature of `random' price changes," Papers cond-mat/0307332,, revised Aug 2003.
    3. J. Doyne Farmer, 2002. "Market force, ecology and evolution," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(5), pages 895-953, November.
    4. Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & J. Doyne Farmer & Fabrizio Lillo, 2008. "How markets slowly digest changes in supply and demand," Papers 0809.0822,
    5. Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Julien Kockelkoren & Marc Potters, 2006. "Random walks, liquidity molasses and critical response in financial markets," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(2), pages 115-123.
    6. Lillo Fabrizio & Farmer J. Doyne, 2004. "The Long Memory of the Efficient Market," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(3), pages 1-35, September.
    7. Esteban Moro & Javier Vicente & Luis G. Moyano & Austin Gerig & J. Doyne Farmer & Gabriella Vaglica & Fabrizio Lillo & Rosario N. Mantegna, 2009. "Market impact and trading profile of large trading orders in stock markets," Papers 0908.0202,
    8. J. Doyne Farmer & Austin Gerig & Fabrizio Lillo & Szabolcs Mike, 2006. "Market efficiency and the long-memory of supply and demand: is price impact variable and permanent or fixed and temporary?," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(2), pages 107-112.
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