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The Professional Development of Graduate Students for Teaching Activities: The Students’ Perspective


  • KimMarie McGoldrick
  • Gail Hoyt
  • David Colander


This article provides insight into the skill-development activities of graduate students at U.S. institutions providing graduate education in economics. The authors document the extent of student participation in and preparation for teaching-related activities while in graduate school, finding that more than 50 percent of students are involved in teaching-related activities such as grading, leading recitation sections, and teaching their own sections and that most were satisfied with their preparation. Important differences in participation in these activities are highlighted by assistantship assignments, institution rank, and gender. Findings suggest that programs could do more to prepare students for participation in teaching specific professional activities after graduation.

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  • KimMarie McGoldrick & Gail Hoyt & David Colander, 2010. "The Professional Development of Graduate Students for Teaching Activities: The Students’ Perspective," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 194-201, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:41:y:2010:i:2:p:194-201 DOI: 10.1080/00220481003613862

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Stefan Szymanski & Stefan KÈsenne, 2004. "Competitive balance and gate revenue sharing in team sports," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 165-177, March.
    2. Daniel R. Marburger, 1997. "Gate Revenue Sharing And Luxury Taxes In Professional Sports," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(2), pages 114-123, April.
    3. Stefan KÉsenne, 2004. "Competitive Balance and Revenue Sharing," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 5(2), pages 206-212, May.
    4. Stefan Szymanski, 2006. "Tilting the Playing Field: Why a sports league planner would choose less, not more, competitive balance," Working Papers 0620, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
    5. Stefan Szymanski, 2003. "The Economic Design of Sporting Contests," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(4), pages 1137-1187, December.
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