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Would You Like to be a Prosumer? Information Revelation, Personalization and Price Discrimination in Electronic Markets

  • Martin Bandulet
  • Karl Morasch

Electronic commerce and flexible manufacturing allow personalization of initially standardized products at low cost. Will customers provide the information necessary for personalization? Assuming that a consumer can control the amount of information revealed, we analyze how her decision interacts with the pricing strategy of a monopolist who may abuse the information to obtain a larger share of total surplus. We consider two scenarios, one where consumers have different tastes but identical willingness to pay and another with high and low valuation customers. In both cases full revelation may only result if the monopolist can commit to a maximum price before consumers decide about disclosure.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13571510500128038
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal International Journal of the Economics of Business.

Volume (Year): 12 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 251-271

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ijecbs:v:12:y:2005:i:2:p:251-271
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  1. J. Yannis Bakos, 1997. "Reducing Buyer Search Costs: Implications for Electronic Marketplaces," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 43(12), pages 1676-1692, December.
  2. Alessandro Acquisti & Hal R. Varian, 2002. "Contidioning Prices on Purchase History," Microeconomics 0210001, EconWPA.
  3. Steven C. Salop, 1979. "Monopolistic Competition with Outside Goods," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(1), pages 141-156, Spring.
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