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Market Preemption and Entry Deterrence: Evidence from the Golf Course Industry

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  • Stephen Shmanske

Abstract

The population in a given geographical area has to be large enough before the area can support the entry of a golf course. The required amount of population will be higher if costs are higher, or if the underlying demand to golf by residents is lower, or if there is more preexisting competition from incumbent golf courses. If incumbent golf courses undertake entry-deterring strategies, either explicitly or implicitly, the required population will be higher still. If population is expected to grow quickly, then the amount of population required by the entry date could be lower. These effects are measured and analyzed in this empirical study of the entry of 104 golf courses in the greater San Francisco Bay Area between 1893 and 2001.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Shmanske, 2004. "Market Preemption and Entry Deterrence: Evidence from the Golf Course Industry," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(1), pages 55-68.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ijecbs:v:11:y:2004:i:1:p:55-68
    DOI: 10.1080/1357151032000172237
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sofka, Wolfgang & Schmidt, Tobias, 2004. "I Like The Way You Move: An Empirical Investigation into the Mechanisms Behind First Mover and Follower Strategies," ZEW Discussion Papers 04-87, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. Frank Limehouse & Michael Maloney & Kurt Rotthoff, 2012. "Peak-Load Versus Discriminatory Pricing: Evidence from the Golf Industry," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 40(3), pages 151-165, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Preemptive Entry; Entry Deterrence; Golf Course Economics; Subsidized Pricing; Municipal Golf; Privatization; L11; L33; L83; D43;

    JEL classification:

    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • L33 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Comparison of Public and Private Enterprise and Nonprofit Institutions; Privatization; Contracting Out
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism
    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection

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