IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

What determines the survival of internet IPOs?


  • Tjalling van der Goot
  • Noud van Giersbergen
  • Michiel Botman


This article examines whether the variables that are significant in noninternet initial public offering (IPOs) play a similar role for internet IPOs. To this end, we analyse the determinants of survival of internet firms that have gone public at the NASDAQ stock exchange from December 1996 through February 2001. Financial and nonfinancial data published in the IPO prospectuses are examined. For our analysis, we use the semiparametric Cox proportional hazard model and estimate the effect of these variables on the trading (survival) time using the parametric Log-logistic survival model. It appears that the average operating history of internet IPOs is remarkably small compared to noninternet IPOs, namely 2.4 and 10 years, respectively. Furthermore, we find that the average number of risk factors for internet IPOs is four times higher than the number reported for noninternet IPOs. The results of the parametric analysis correspond to the semiparametric results. Our findings hold under a number of different model specifications and robustness checks. The sensitivity analysis in the Log-logistic model reveals that the greatest positive effect on the survival time comes from investor demand followed by operational cash flow over liabilities. The expected survival time is shortened mostly by IPO market level, followed by valuation uncertainty.

Suggested Citation

  • Tjalling van der Goot & Noud van Giersbergen & Michiel Botman, 2009. "What determines the survival of internet IPOs?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(5), pages 547-561.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:5:p:547-561
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840601007369

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Harold Alderman & John Hoddinott & Bill Kinsey, 2006. "Long term consequences of early childhood malnutrition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 450-474, July.
    2. Muysken, Joan & Yetkiner, I. Hakan & Ziesemer, Thomas, 1999. "Health, labour productivity and growth," CCSO Working Papers 200015, University of Groningen, CCSO Centre for Economic Research.
    3. Holtz-Eakin, Douglas & Newey, Whitney & Rosen, Harvey S, 1989. "The Revenues-Expenditures Nexus: Evidence from Local Government Data," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(2), pages 415-429, May.
    4. Dumitrescu, Elena-Ivona & Hurlin, Christophe, 2012. "Testing for Granger non-causality in heterogeneous panels," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 1450-1460.
    5. Parkin, David & McGuire, Alistair & Yule, Brian, 1987. "Aggregate health care expenditures and national income : Is health care a luxury good?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 109-127, June.
    6. Ulf‐G. Gerdtham, 1992. "Pooling international health care expenditure data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 1(4), pages 217-231, December.
    7. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    8. Hsiao, Cheng & Mountain, Dean C. & Chan, M. W. Luke & Tsui, Kai Y., 1989. "Modeling Ontario regional electricity system demand using a mixed fixed and random coefficients approach," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 565-587, December.
    9. Nair-Reichert, Usha & Weinhold, Diana, 2001. " Causality Tests for Cross-Country Panels: A New Look at FDI and Economic Growth in Developing Countries," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 63(2), pages 153-171, May.
    10. Hitiris, Theo & Posnett, John, 1992. "The determinants and effects of health expenditure in developed countries," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 173-181, August.
    11. Schultz, T. Paul & Tansel, Aysit, 1997. "Wage and labor supply effects of illness in Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana: instrumental variable estimates for days disabled," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 251-286, August.
    12. Chamberlain, Gary, 1982. "Multivariate regression models for panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 5-46, January.
    13. Henrik Hansen & John Rand, 2006. "On the Causal Links Between FDI and Growth in Developing Countries," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(1), pages 21-41, January.
    14. Hansen, Paul & King, Alan, 1996. "The determinants of health care expenditure: A cointegration approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 127-137, February.
    15. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Jonsson, Bengt, 2000. "International comparisons of health expenditure: Theory, data and econometric analysis," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 11-53 Elsevier.
    16. Lant Pritchett & Lawrence H. Summers, 1996. "Wealthier is Healthier," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(4), pages 841-868.
    17. Nancy Devlin & Paul Hansen, 2001. "Health care spending and economic output: Granger causality," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(8), pages 561-564.
    18. Pedro Pita Barros, 1998. "The black box of health care expenditure growth determinants," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(6), pages 533-544.
    19. Berta Rivera & Luis Currais, 1999. "Economic growth and health: direct impact or reverse causation?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(11), pages 761-764.
    20. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-1426, November.
    21. Jennifer Roberts, 1999. "Sensitivity of elasticity estimates for OECD health care spending: analysis of a dynamic heterogeneous data field," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(5), pages 459-472.
    22. repec:dau:papers:123456789/6159 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Blomqvist, A. G. & Carter, R. A. L., 1997. "Is health care really a luxury?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 207-229, April.
    24. Oded Galor & David Mayer-Foulkes, 2004. "Food for Thought: Basic Needs and Persistent Educational Inequality," GE, Growth, Math methods 0410002, EconWPA.
    25. Hoover, Kevin D., 2003. "Some causal lessons from macroeconomics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 121-125, January.
    26. Glewwe, Paul & Jacoby, Hanan G. & King, Elizabeth M., 2001. "Early childhood nutrition and academic achievement: a longitudinal analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 345-368, September.
    27. Peter Glick & David E. Sahn, 1998. "Health and productivity in a heterogeneous urban labour market," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(2), pages 203-216, February.
    28. Behrman, Jere R, 1996. "The Impact of Health and Nutrition on Education," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 23-37, February.
    29. Selma J. Mushkin, 1962. "Health as an Investment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 129-129.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Sophie Pommet, 2011. "The survival of venture capital backed companies : an analysis of the French case," Working Papers halshs-00720927, HAL.
    2. Wagner, S. & Cockburn, I., 2010. "Patents and the survival of Internet-related IPOs," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 214-228, March.
    3. Sophie Pommet, 2012. "The Survival of Venture Capital Backed Companies: An Analysis of the French Case," GREDEG Working Papers 2012-14, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    4. Aleksandar Bradic, 2012. "The Role of Social Feedback in Financing of Technology Ventures," Papers 1301.2196,
    5. Cressy, Robert & Farag, Hisham, 2014. "Stairway to heaven or gateway to hell? A competing risks analysis of delistings from Hong Kong's Growth Enterprise Market," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 195-205.
    6. Henson, James, 2014. "The Survival of Nonprofits in the United States," MPRA Paper 59494, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:5:p:547-561. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.