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Disaggregated capital stock estimation for Austria - methods, concepts and results


  • B. Bohm
  • A. Gleiss
  • M. Wagner
  • D. Ziegler


Based on a survey of the appropriate literature and on separate investigations concerning distributions of asset lives and depreciation patterns of vehicles, gross and net capital stocks as well as depreciation at constant prices and at replacement cost have been estimated for Austria using the Perpetual Inventory Method. The problem of the limited length of investment time series has tried to be overcome by assigning a fixed age to each initial stock. The level of disaggregation for the calculations is ONACE 2-digit2 and this has been further broken down to the categories buildings, machinery and equipment, and vehicles. All available a priori knowledge and data have been incorporated. All estimates of capital stocks and depreciation based on industry level investment data are subject to uncertainty due to the lack of information at the asset type level. In order to give a quantitative assessment of this uncertainty, for the public as well as for the private enterprise sector, several scenarios have been calculated. In addition a thorough sensitivity analysis with respect to all relevant parameters including the age assigned to the initial stock has been performed.

Suggested Citation

  • B. Bohm & A. Gleiss & M. Wagner & D. Ziegler, 2002. "Disaggregated capital stock estimation for Austria - methods, concepts and results," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 23-37.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:34:y:2002:i:1:p:23-37
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840010027559

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Abdelhak Senhadji, 1997. "Two common problems related to the use of the Armington aggregator in computable general equilibrium models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 23-25.
    2. Shoven,John B. & Whalley,John, 1992. "Applying General Equilibrium," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521266550, March.
    3. Brown, Drusilla K., 1987. "Tariffs, the terms of trade, and national product differentiation," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 503-526.
    4. Zhuang, Juzhong, 1996. "Estimating Distortions in the Chinese Economy: A General Equilibrium Approach," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(252), pages 543-568, November.
    5. Wang, Zhi, 1997. "The Impact of China and Taiwan Joining the World Trade Organization on U.S. and World Agricultural Trade: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," Technical Bulletins 184382, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    6. Dewatripont, Mathias & Michel, Gilles, 1987. "On closure rules, homogeneity and dynamics in applied general equilibrium models," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 65-76, June.
    7. Bandara, Jayatilleke S, 1991. " Computable General Equilibrium Models for Development Policy Analysis in LDCs," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 3-69.
    8. Dirk Willenbockel, 1999. "On apparent problems with the use of the Armington aggregator in computable general equilibrium models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(9), pages 589-591.
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    Cited by:

    1. Werner Hölzl & Robert Leisch, 2004. "Estimates of capital stocks and capital productivity in Austrian manufacturing industries, 1978 -1994," Working Papers geewp41, Vienna University of Economics and Business Research Group: Growth and Employment in Europe: Sustainability and Competitiveness.

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