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Market overreaction and underreaction: tests of the directional and magnitude effects

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  • Frank J. Fabozzi
  • Chun-Yip Fung
  • Kin Lam
  • Wing-Keung Wong

Abstract

We investigate whether the US equity market exhibits underreaction or overreaction. More specifically, we study the directional and magnitude effects associated with abnormal market reaction. The directional effect is the phenomenon that an extreme price movement will be followed by a price movement in the opposite (overreaction hypothesis) or same (underreaction hypothesis) direction. The magnitude effect is the phenomenon that the more extreme the initial price movement is, the greater the subsequent adjustment will be. In this article, we study both effects by considering extreme, medium and mild winner--loser portfolios. The directional effect is assessed by the profits generated by these portfolios, and the magnitude effect is assessed by comparing the difference in profits between these portfolios. Three tests are developed and applied to test the magnitude effect. Empirically we find support for both of these effects for extreme, medium and mild winner--loser portfolios.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank J. Fabozzi & Chun-Yip Fung & Kin Lam & Wing-Keung Wong, 2013. "Market overreaction and underreaction: tests of the directional and magnitude effects," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(18), pages 1469-1482, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apfiec:v:23:y:2013:i:18:p:1469-1482
    DOI: 10.1080/09603107.2013.829200
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    1. repec:eee:ecofin:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:346-358 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:wsi:afexxx:v:13:y:2018:i:03:n:s2010495218500112 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Chia-Lin Chang & Michael McAleer & Wing-Keung Wong, 2018. "Big Data, Computational Science, Economics, Finance, Marketing, Management, and Psychology: Connections," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(1), pages 1-29, March.
    4. repec:aag:wpaper:v:22:y:2018:i:1:p:36-94 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Guo, Xu & McAleer, Michael & Wong, Wing-Keung & Zhu, Lixing, 2017. "A Bayesian approach to excess volatility, short-term underreaction and long-term overreaction during financial crises," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 346-358.
    6. repec:gei:journl:v:4:y:2017:i:2:p:237-247 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Chang, C-L. & McAleer, M.J. & Wong, W.-K., 2018. "Decision Sciences, Economics, Finance, Business, Computing, and Big Data: Connections," Econometric Institute Research Papers 18-024/III, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    8. Richard Lu & Chen-Chen Yang & Wing-Keung Wong, 2018. "Time Diversification: Perspectives From The Economic Index Of Riskiness," Annals of Financial Economics (AFE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 13(03), pages 1-15, September.
    9. Terence Tai-Leung Chong, Bingqing Cao, Wing Keung Wong, 2017. "A Principal Component Approach to Measuring Investor Sentiment in Hong Kong," Journal of Management Sciences, Geist Science, Iqra University, Faculty of Business Administration, vol. 4(2), pages 237-247, October.
    10. Olfa Chaouachi & Fatma Wy?me Ben Mrad Douagi, 2014. "Overreaction Effect in the Tunisian Stock Market," Journal of Asian Business Strategy, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(11), pages 134-140, November.
    11. Chia-Lin Chang & Michael McAleer & Wing-Keung Wong, 2018. "Big Data, Computational Science, Economics, Finance, Marketing, Management, and Psychology: Connections," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(1), pages 1-29, March.

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