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Ethnic fragmentation and police spending

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  • Olugbenga Ajilore
  • John Smith

Abstract

Using a two-stage least-squares procedure, we estimate the relationship between ethnic fragmentation and police spending using a cross-section of the US counties. Our results show that, when controlling for community characteristics and accounting for simultaneity bias, ethnic fragmentation is positively related to police spending. This article contributes to the understanding of the stylized fact that public spending on police increased over a period in which the incidence of crime decreased.

Suggested Citation

  • Olugbenga Ajilore & John Smith, 2011. "Ethnic fragmentation and police spending," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 329-332.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:18:y:2011:i:4:p:329-332
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851003670650
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Steven D. Levitt, 2004. "Understanding Why Crime Fell in the 1990s: Four Factors that Explain the Decline and Six that Do Not," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(1), pages 163-190, Winter.
    2. Steven D. Levitt, 2002. "Using Electoral Cycles in Police Hiring to Estimate the Effects of Police on Crime: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1244-1250, September.
    3. Alberto Alesina & Reza Baqir & William Easterly, 1999. "Public Goods and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(4), pages 1243-1284.
    4. Justin McCrary, 2002. "Using Electoral Cycles in Police Hiring to Estimate the Effect of Police on Crime: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1236-1243, September.
    5. Rafael Di Tella & Ernesto Schargrodsky, 2004. "Do Police Reduce Crime? Estimates Using the Allocation of Police Forces After a Terrorist Attack," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 115-133, March.
    6. Morgan Kelly, 2000. "Inequality And Crime," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(4), pages 530-539, November.
    7. Levitt, Steven D, 1997. "Using Electoral Cycles in Police Hiring to Estimate the Effect of Police on Crime," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 270-290, June.
    8. Joanne M. Doyle & Ehsan Ahmed & Robert N. Horn, 1999. "The Effects of Labor Markets and Income Inequality on Crime: Evidence from Panel Data," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 65(4), pages 717-738, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jannett Highfill & Kevin O’Brien, 2015. "The Effect of Ethnic Diversity on Municipal Spending," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 305-318, September.
    2. Olugbenga Ajilore, 2016. "The Spillover Effect of Race on Police Expenditures: An Alternative Test of the Minority Threat Hypothesis," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 43(1), pages 21-34, March.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H76 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Other Expenditure Categories
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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