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Growth, fertility and human capital: A survey


  • Robert Tamura

    () (Department of Economics, Clemson University Clemson, SC 29634, USA)


This paper surveys recent work on endogenous fertility and endogenous growth. These models provide the building blocks for a theory of development. They are capable of explaining income and fertility differentials between rich and poor countries. They can produce switching behavior, countries that transform themselves from no growth economies into high growth economies. The fertility and growth effects of social security programs are also examined. Finally models with increasing returns to population are presented. They are capable of reproducing very long term relationships between human capital, fertility and economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Tamura, 2000. "Growth, fertility and human capital: A survey," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 183-229.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:specre:v:2:y:2000:i:3:p:183-229

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michael Dotsey & Robert G. King & Alexander L. Wolman, 1999. "State-Dependent Pricing and the General Equilibrium Dynamics of Money and Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 655-690.
    2. Robert King & Alexander L. Wolman, 1999. "What Should the Monetary Authority Do When Prices Are Sticky?," NBER Chapters,in: Monetary Policy Rules, pages 349-404 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1977. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 297-308, June.
    4. Chadha, Jagjit S & Haldane, Andrew G & Janssen, Norbert G J, 1998. "Shoe-Leather Costs Reconsidered," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 363-382, March.
    5. Pencavel, John, 1987. "Labor supply of men: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 3-102 Elsevier.
    6. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
    7. Robert E. Lucas, Jr., 2000. "Inflation and Welfare," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(2), pages 247-274, March.
    8. King, Robert G. & Wolman, Alexander L., 2013. "Inflation Targeting in a St. Louis Model of the 21st Century," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Nov, pages 543-574.
    9. Erceg, Christopher J. & Henderson, Dale W. & Levin, Andrew T., 2000. "Optimal monetary policy with staggered wage and price contracts," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 281-313, October.
    10. Miguel Casares, 2001. "Long-Run Analysis in Alternative Optimizing Monetary Models," Documentos de Trabajo - Lan Gaiak Departamento de Economía - Universidad Pública de Navarra 0107, Departamento de Economía - Universidad Pública de Navarra.
    11. Dotsey, Michael & Ireland, Peter, 1996. "The welfare cost of inflation in general equilibrium," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 29-47, February.
    12. Alexander L. Wolman, 1997. "Zero inflation and the Friedman rule: a welfare comparison," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Fall, pages 1-21.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Berkel & Axel Börsch-Supan & Alexander Ludwig & Joachim Winter, 2004. "Sind die Probleme der Bevölkerungsalterung durch eine höhere Geburtenrate lösbar?," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 5(1), pages 71-90, February.
    2. Yuhua Shi & Jie Zhang, 2009. "On high fertility rates in developing countries: birth limits, birth taxes, or education subsidies?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(3), pages 603-640, July.
    3. Holger Strulik, 2003. "Mortality, the Trade-off between Child Quality and Quantity, and Demo-economic Development," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(4), pages 499-520, November.
    4. Luciano Fanti & Piero Manfredi, 2003. "The Solow¡¯S Model With Endogenous Population: A Neoclassical Growth Cycle Model," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 103-115, December.
    5. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:10:y:2003:i:2:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Gete, Pedro & Porchia, Paolo, 2010. "Fertility and Consumption when Having a Child is a Risky Investment," MPRA Paper 27885, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Lucas Bretschger, 2004. "Natural resource scarcity and long-run development: central mechanisms when conditions are seemingly unfavourable," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 03/29, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    8. Paolo Porchia & Pedro Gete, 2011. "Fertility and Consumption when Having a Child is a Risky Investment," 2011 Meeting Papers 563, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item


    Endogenous fertility; growth; economic development;

    JEL classification:

    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity


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