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The process of basic training, applied training, maintaining the performance of an observer

Listed author(s):
  • José Losada

    ()

  • Rumen Manolov
Registered author(s):

    In the field of observational methodology the observer is obviously a central figure, and close attention should be paid to the process through which he or she acquires, applies, and maintains the skills required. Basic training in how to apply the operational definitions of categories and the rules for coding, coupled with the opportunity to use the observation instrument in real-life situations, can have a positive effect in terms of the degree of agreement achieved when one evaluates intra- and inter-observer reliability. Several authors, including Arias et al. (Apunts, 4:40–45, 2009 ) and Medina and Delgado (Motricidad: Revista de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte, 5:69–86, 1999 ) , have put forward proposals for the process of basic and applied training in this context. Reid and De Master (ORI Res Bull, 12:1–13, 1972 ) focuses on the observer’s performance and how to maintain the acquired skills, it being argued that periodic checks are needed after initial training because an observer may, over time, become less reliable due to the inherent complexity of category systems. The purpose of this subsequent training is to maintain acceptable levels of observer reliability. Various strategies can be used to this end, including providing feedback about those categories associated with a good reliability index, or offering re-training in how to apply those that yield lower indices. The aim of this study is to develop a performance-based index that is capable of assessing an observer’s ability to produce reliable observations in conjunction with other observers. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11135-014-9989-7
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Quality & Quantity.

    Volume (Year): 49 (2015)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 339-347

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:qualqt:v:49:y:2015:i:1:p:339-347
    DOI: 10.1007/s11135-014-9989-7
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

    Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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    1. Pedro Sánchez-Algarra & M. Anguera, 2013. "Qualitative/quantitative integration in the inductive observational study of interactive behaviour: impact of recording and coding among predominating perspectives," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 1237-1257, February.
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