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articles: Modelling the geography of economic activities on a continuous space

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  • Giuseppe Arbia

    () (Department of Science, University G. d'Annunzio, Pescara, Viale Pindaro, 42, 65127 Pescara, Italy)

Abstract

In the present article we propose a spatial micro econometric approach for studying the geographical concentration of economic activities. We analyse the incentives to use this approach rather than the traditional one based on regional aggregates. As an example, we present our prototypical theoretic model - to be seen as a continuous space version of Krugman's concentration model - that includes birth, survival and growth components. We present a numerical estimation of the birth model for a set of data referring to the concentration of the manufacturing industries in the San Marino Republic.

Suggested Citation

  • Giuseppe Arbia, 2001. "articles: Modelling the geography of economic activities on a continuous space," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 80(4), pages 411-424.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:presci:v:80:y:2001:i:4:p:411-424 Note: Received: 18 May 1998
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Burger, M.J. & van Oort, F.G. & van der Knaap, G.A., 2008. "A Treatise on the Geographical Scale of Agglomeration Externalities and the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2008-076-ORG, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    2. Margherita Gerolimetto & Stefano Magrini, 2014. "Spatial analysis of employment multilpliers in Spanish labor markets," RIEDS - Rivista Italiana di Economia, Demografia e Statistica - Italian Review of Economics, Demography and Statistics, SIEDS Societa' Italiana di Economia Demografia e Statistica, vol. 68(3-4), pages 87-94, July-Dece.
    3. Lafourcade, Miren & Mion, Giordano, 2007. "Concentration, agglomeration and the size of plants," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, pages 46-68.
    4. Chantelot Sèbastien & Filippi Maryline & Peres-Quesada Stèphanie, 2011. "The French agricultural cooperative system: An explanatory spatial data analysis," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1029, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Arbia, Giuseppe & Espa, Giuseppe & Giuliani, Diego & Dickson, Maria Michela, 2014. "Spatio-temporal clustering in the pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturing industry: A geographical micro-level analysis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 298-304.
    6. Scholte, Robert S. & van den Berg, Gerard J. & Lindeboom, Maarten, 2015. "Long-run effects of gestation during the Dutch Hunger Winter famine on labor market and hospitalization outcomes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, pages 17-30.
    7. Margherita Gerolimetto & Stefano Magrini, 2016. "A spatial analysis of employment multipliers in the US," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 277-285, October.
    8. Jitendra Parajuli & Kingsley Haynes, 2013. "An Exploratory Analysis of New Firm Formation in New England," ERSA conference papers ersa13p274, European Regional Science Association.
    9. Frank G. van Oort & Martijn J. Burger & Joris Knoben & Otto Raspe, 2012. "Multilevel Approaches And The Firm-Agglomeration Ambiguity In Economic Growth Studies," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 468-491, July.
    10. Florent Bonneu & Christine Thomas-Agnan, 2015. "Measuring and Testing Spatial Mass Concentration with Micro-geographic Data," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 289-316.
    11. repec:kap:jgeosy:v:19:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10109-017-0249-y is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Tamás Dusek, 2005. "The modifiable areal unit problem in regional economics," ERSA conference papers ersa05p357, European Regional Science Association.
    13. Marcon, Eric & Puech, Florence, 2017. "A typology of distance-based measures of spatial concentration," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 56-67.
    14. Reades, Jonathan & Smith, Duncan, 2014. "Mapping the ‘space of flows’: the geography of global business telecommunications and employment specialization in the London mega-city-region," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 55812, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Birth-death processes; economic geography; geographical concentration; Markov fields; regional economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • C1 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General
    • O0 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - General
    • R3 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location

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