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Household fertility responses following communism: Transition in the Czech Republic and Slovakia

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  • Robert S. Chase

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Abstract

In central Europe fertility fell during transition from centrally planned to market oriented economies. Families reevaluated fertility plans facing new wages, reduced child-care subsidies, and economic uncertainty. Using micro-data from 1984 and 1993 in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, this paper relates fertility changes following Communism to wages, prices␣and risks. Earnings have little impact on fertility timing during transition, though age, job uncertainty, and children conceived during Communism do. In the Czech Republic, changed fertility demand parameters account for much of the␣fall in fertility. In Slovakia a sizable proportion results from predictable responses to changed incentives. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Robert S. Chase, 2003. "Household fertility responses following communism: Transition in the Czech Republic and Slovakia," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(3), pages 579-595, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:16:y:2003:i:3:p:579-595 DOI: 10.1007/s00148-003-0128-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. J. A. Mirrlees, 1967. "Optimum Growth when Technology is Changing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(1), pages 95-124.
    2. Pasquale Scaramozzino & Giancarlo Marini, 2000. "Social time preference," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 13(4), pages 639-645.
    3. Blanchard, Olivier J, 1985. "Debt, Deficits, and Finite Horizons," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(2), pages 223-247, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marcus Klemm, 2012. "Job Security and Fertility: Evidence from German Reunification," Ruhr Economic Papers 0379, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    2. Sumon Kumar Bhaumik & Jeffrey B. Nugent, 2005. "Does Economic Uncertainty Affect the Decision to Bear Children? Evidence from East and West Germany," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp788, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    3. Brainerd, Elizabeth, 2010. "The Demographic Transformation of Post-Socialist Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 015, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Klemm, Marcus, 2012. "Job Security and Fertility: Evidence from German Reunification," Ruhr Economic Papers 379, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    5. repec:zbw:rwirep:0379 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transition; fertility; household behavior; J13; P36;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty

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