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The Mindful Hedonist? Relationships between Well-Being Orientations, Mindfulness and Well-Being Experiences

Author

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  • Nadine Richter

    (University of Applied Sciences and Arts Dortmund
    Ruhr-University Bochum)

  • Marcel Hunecke

    (University of Applied Sciences and Arts Dortmund
    Ruhr-University Bochum)

Abstract

Orientations to well-being, including personal values, motives and goals regarding one’s well-being are often related to the experience of well-being. At the same time, studies show positive effects of mindfulness on well-being. It is conceivable, that the strength of the connection between well-being orientations and experiences depend on the degree of dispositional mindfulness. To explore relationships between orientations and experiences of well-being as well as the potential moderation effect of mindfulness, two cross-sectional online studies with German-speaking participants were conducted. In Study 1 (N = 414) mindfulness moderated the relationship between life of pleasure (measured by the Orientations to Happiness Scale) and life satisfaction (β = −0.10, p = 0.017) as well as the relationship between life of meaning (β = −0.10, p = 0.028). As hypothesized, mindfulness moderated the connection between life of engagement and life satisfaction (β = −0.14, p = 0.001) as well as the negative relationship between search for meaning and life satisfaction (β = 0.15, p

Suggested Citation

  • Nadine Richter & Marcel Hunecke, 2021. "The Mindful Hedonist? Relationships between Well-Being Orientations, Mindfulness and Well-Being Experiences," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 22(7), pages 3111-3135, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jhappi:v:22:y:2021:i:7:d:10.1007_s10902-021-00358-5
    DOI: 10.1007/s10902-021-00358-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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