IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/empeco/v28y2003i4p733-751.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Spatial and supply/demand agglomeration economies: State- and industry-linkages in the U.S. food system

Author

Listed:
  • Jeffrey P. Cohen

    ()

  • Catherine J. Morrison Paul

    ()

Abstract

Cost-impacts of spatial and industrial spillovers on economicperformance are evaluated by incorporating activity level measures for nearby states and related industries into a cost function model. We focus on localization and urbanization economies for state level food processing industries, from activity levels of similar industries in neighboring states, agricultural input suppliers, and final product demand. We find significant cost-savings from proximity to other food manufacturing centers, and areas with high purchasing power. Cost savings from locating near an agricultural area are also evident, although it seems costly to be located within a rural agricultural state, implying thin market diseconomies. Marginal production costs instead appear higher in more urban, and lower in more rural, areas. These spillover patterns also have input composition implications; materials demand responses are the most closely tracked by the agglomeration cost effects, and capital and labor impacts vary. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey P. Cohen & Catherine J. Morrison Paul, 2003. "Spatial and supply/demand agglomeration economies: State- and industry-linkages in the U.S. food system," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 28(4), pages 733-751, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:28:y:2003:i:4:p:733-751
    DOI: 10.1007/s00181-003-0156-6
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00181-003-0156-6
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zhenhua Chen & Kingsley Haynes, 2015. "Multilevel assessment of public transportation infrastructure: a spatial econometric computable general equilibrium approach," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(3), pages 663-685, May.
    2. Zhenhua Chen & Kingsley E. Haynes, 2015. "Public surface transportation and regional output: A spatial panel approach," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 94(4), pages 727-751, November.
    3. Jean-Pierre Huiban, 2009. "Urban versus Rural Firms: Does Location Affect Labor Demand?," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(4), pages 649-672.
    4. Zhenhua Chen, 2013. "Spatial Impact of Transportation Infrastructure: A Spatial Econometric CGE Approach," ERSA conference papers ersa13p241, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Cohen, Jeffrey P. & Paul, Catherine J. Morrison, 2005. "Agglomeration economies and industry location decisions: the impacts of spatial and industrial spillovers," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 215-237, May.
    6. Derek G. Brewin & Daniel C. Monchuk & Mark D. Partridge, 2009. "Examining the Adoption of Product and Process Innovations in the Canadian Food Processing Industry," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 57(1), pages 75-97, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spatial; costs; food; agglomeration;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:28:y:2003:i:4:p:733-751. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.