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Output gap uncertainty: Does it matter for the Taylor rule?

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  • Frank Smets

    (ECB, D-60311 Frankfurt am Main, Germany)

Abstract

This paper analyses the effect of measurement error in the output gap on efficient monetary policy rules in a simple estimated model of the US economy. While it is a well-known result that such additive uncertainty does not affect the optimal feedback rule in a linear-quadratic framework, it is shown that output gap uncertainty can have a significant effect on the efficient response coefficients in restricted instrument rules such as the popular Taylor rule. Output gap uncertainty reduces the response to the current estimated output gap relative to current inflation and may partly explain why the parameters in estimated Taylor rules are often much less than what optimal control exercises which assume the state of the economy is known suggest.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Smets, 2002. "Output gap uncertainty: Does it matter for the Taylor rule?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 113-129.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:27:y:2002:i:1:p:113-129
    Note: received: September 2000/Final version received: February 2001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Henderson, Dale W. & McKibbin, Warwick J., 1993. "A comparison of some basic monetary policy regimes for open economies: implications of different degrees of instrument adjustment and wage persistence," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 221-317, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy · output gap · uncertainty;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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