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Mortality trends in Philadelphia: Age- and cause-specific death rates 1870–1930

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  • Gretchen Condran
  • Rose Cheney

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  • Gretchen Condran & Rose Cheney, 1982. "Mortality trends in Philadelphia: Age- and cause-specific death rates 1870–1930," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 19(1), pages 97-123, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:19:y:1982:i:1:p:97-123 DOI: 10.2307/2061131
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frank Whitson Fetter, 1953. "The Authorship of Economic Articles in the Edinburgh Review, 1802-47," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61, pages 232-232.
    2. Lloyd, Peter J, 1969. "Elementary Geometric/Arithmetic Series and Early Production Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(1), pages 21-34, Jan./Feb..
    3. Taylor, James Stephen, 1969. "The Mythology of the Old Poor Law," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(02), pages 292-297, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hollingsworth, J. Rogers & Hanneman, Robert A. & Hage, Jerald, 1990. "Investment in Human Capital of a Powerful Interest Group: The Case of the Medical Profession in Britain, France, Sweden and the United States from 1890 to 1970," MPIfG Discussion Paper 90/9, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    2. Anderson, D. Mark & Charles, Kerwin Kofi & Las Heras Olivares, Claudio & Rees, Daniel I., 2017. "Was the First Public Health Campaign Successful? The Tuberculosis Movement and its Effect on Mortality," IZA Discussion Papers 10590, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Robert W. Fogel, 1986. "Nutrition and the Decline in Mortality since 1700: Some Preliminary Findings," NBER Chapters,in: Long-Term Factors in American Economic Growth, pages 439-556 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. D. Mark Anderson & Kerwin Kofi Charles & Claudio Las Heras Olivares & Daniel I. Rees, 2017. "Was The First Public Health Campaign Successful? The Tuberculosis Movement and Its Effect on Mortality," NBER Working Papers 23219, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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