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Entrepreneurial migration and regional opportunities in developing countries

Author

Listed:
  • Marthen L. Ndoen

    (Department of Economics, Satya Wacana Christian University, Jalan Diponegoro 52 Salatiga-Indonesia)

  • Piet Rietveld

    (Department of Spatial Economics, Vrije University Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

  • (*), Peter Nijkamp

    (Department of Spatial Economics, Vrije University Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

  • Kees Gorter

    (Department of Economics, Satya Wacana Christian University, Jalan Diponegoro 52 Salatiga-Indonesia)

Abstract

This paper aims to investigate the entrepreneurial migrants' preferences for a location for business activities in developing countries. In the modelling framework six socio-economic and six socio-cultural variables are used in this study to investigate the migrants' propensity to stay at a particular region. The empirical research was carried out in East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. It appears that the presence of a supporting informal network is the most critical factor that attracts and keeps the entrepreneurial migrants in a particular region. Socio-cultural variables like experience and education play a less significant role in the migrants' decision to stay in a given region.

Suggested Citation

  • Marthen L. Ndoen & Piet Rietveld & (*), Peter Nijkamp & Kees Gorter, 2002. "Entrepreneurial migration and regional opportunities in developing countries," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 36(3), pages 421-436.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:36:y:2002:i:3:p:421-436
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chris Robinson & Nigel Tomes, 1982. "Self-Selection and Interprovincial Migration in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 15(3), pages 474-502, August.
    2. Hay, Michael J, 1980. "A Structural Equations Model of Migration in Tunisia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 345-358, January.
    3. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Solimano, Andres, 2006. "The International Mobility of Talent and its Impact on Global Development," WIDER Working Paper Series DP2006/08, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. repec:krk:eberjl:v:3:y:2015:i:3:p:29-50 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Andrés Solimano, 2010. "The International Mobility of Talent and its Impact on Global Development," Working Papers id:3063, eSocialSciences.
    4. Isidoro Romero & Zhikun Yu, 2015. "Analyzing the influence of social capital on self-employment: a study of Chinese immigrants," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, pages 877-899.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

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