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Networks of Support for New Migrant Communities


  • Robert MacKenzie
  • Chris Forde
  • Zinovijus Ciupijus


This article examines the role of support mechanisms for new migrant communities provided by networks of statutory, third-sector and refugee community organisations. The article explores the dynamics of the relationships between support groups, with analysis located in the urban context of NorthTown. The findings point to the possibility of tension between migrant support groups where there is a perceived need to compete over resources or political influence. Moreover, it is argued that there is a risk that institutional goals of organisational sustainability may take precedence over substantive goals of support provision. The ability of support groups to assert agency in terms of strategic responses to structural constraints on sustainability is explored. It is argued that an organising logic based on the creation of a political community within the new migrant population can prove more sustainable than contingent communities based on commonalities of language or nationality.

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  • Robert MacKenzie & Chris Forde & Zinovijus Ciupijus, 2012. "Networks of Support for New Migrant Communities," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 49(3), pages 631-647, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:49:y:2012:i:3:p:631-647

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