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Reply to “Credible Research Designs for Minimum Wage Studiesâ€

Author

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  • David Neumark
  • William Wascher

Abstract

The authors make three points in this reply to the article by Allegretto, Dube, Reich, and Zipperer (ADRZ 2017). First, ADRZ shed no new light on the sensitivity of estimated minimum wage employment effects to the treatment of trends in state-level panel data, and they make some arguments in this context that are misleading or simply wrong. Second, the key issue ADRZ emphasize—using “close controls†to account for shocks that are correlated with minimum wage changes—does not generate large differences in findings, and ADRZ do not address evidence from Neumark, Salas, and Wascher (NSW 2014a) that questions the validity of the close controls used in Allegretto, Dube, and Reich’s (ADR 2011) and Dube, Lester, and Reich’s (DLR 2010) work. Third, ADRZ ignore or dismiss a growing number of studies that address in various ways the same issue of potential correlations between minimum wages and shocks to low-skill labor markets that ADRZ argue generate spurious evidence of disemployment effects, yet often find rather large negative effects of minimum wages on low-skilled employment.

Suggested Citation

  • David Neumark & William Wascher, 2017. "Reply to “Credible Research Designs for Minimum Wage Studiesâ€," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 70(3), pages 593-609, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:70:y:2017:i:3:p:593-609
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Monika Köppl-Turyna & Michael Christl & Dénes Kucsera, 2019. "Beschäftigungseffekte von Mindestlöhnen: Die Dosis macht das Gift," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 72(02), pages 40-46, January.
    2. Robayo,Monica & Terskaya,Anastasia & Koettl-Brodmann,Stefanie, 2020. "Ex-ante Evaluation of the Impact of Increases in Minimum Wages on Labor Market Outcomes in Kosovo," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9357, The World Bank.
    3. Neumark, David & Yen, Maysen, 2020. "Effects of Recent Minimum Wage Policies in California and Nationwide: Initial Results from a Pre-specified Analysis Plan," IZA Discussion Papers 13062, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Clemens, Jeffrey, 2017. "Pitfalls in the Development of Falsification Tests: An Illustration from the Recent Minimum Wage Literature," MPRA Paper 80154, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Clemens, Jeffrey & Wither, Michael, 2019. "The minimum wage and the Great Recession: Evidence of effects on the employment and income trajectories of low-skilled workers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 170(C), pages 53-67.
    6. David Neumark, 2018. "The Econometrics and Economics of the Employment Effects of Minimum Wages: Getting from Known Unknowns to Known Knowns," CESifo Working Paper Series 7386, CESifo.
    7. Lordan, Grace & Neumark, David, 2018. "People versus machines: The impact of minimum wages on automatable jobs," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 40-53.
    8. David Neumark, 2019. "The Econometrics and Economics of the Employment Effects of Minimum Wages: Getting from Known Unknowns to Known Knowns," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 20(3), pages 293-329, August.
    9. Amanda Y. Agan & Michael D. Makowsky, 2018. "The Minimum Wage, EITC, and Criminal Recidivism," Working Papers 616, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    10. Micheli, Martin, 2020. "It is real: On the relation between minimum wages and labor market outcomes for teenagers," VfS Annual Conference 2020 (Virtual Conference): Gender Economics 224597, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    11. Clemens, Jeffrey, 2017. "The Minimum Wage and the Great Recession: A Response to Zipperer and Recapitulation of the Evidence," MPRA Paper 80153, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Micheli, Martin, 2019. "Labor market effects of minimum wage shocks," Ruhr Economic Papers 830, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    13. Laporsek, Suzana & Orazem, Peter F. & Vodopivec, Matija & Vodopivec, Milan, 2019. "Long-Term Responses to Large Minimum Wage Shocks: Sub-Minimum and Super-Minimum Workers in Slovenia," IZA Discussion Papers 12123, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Neumark, David & Shupe, Cortnie, 2019. "Declining teen employment: minimum wages, returns to schooling, and immigration," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 49-68.
    15. Michael Christl & Monika Köppl-Turyna & Dénes Kucsera, 2019. "Employment Effects of Minimum Wages," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 16(04), pages 01-08, January.
    16. Micheli, Martin, 2019. "It is real: On the relation between minimum wages and labor market outcomes for teenagers," Ruhr Economic Papers 829, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    17. Baptiste Françon, 2020. "Salaire minimum en Allemagne et segmentation de l’emploi," Working Papers of BETA 2020-36, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    18. Marius Berger & Bruno Lanz, 2020. "Minimum wage regulation in Switzerland: survey evidence for restaurants in the canton of Neuchâtel," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics, Springer;Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics, vol. 156(1), pages 1-23, December.
    19. David Neumark, 2017. "The Employment Effects of Minimum Wages: Some Questions We Need to Answer," NBER Working Papers 23584, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. repec:ces:ifodic:v:16:y:2019:i:4:p:50000000004800 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Boffy-Ramirez, Ernest, 2019. "The Short-Run Effects of the Minimum Wage on Employment and Labor Market Participation: Evidence from an Individual-Level Panel," IZA Discussion Papers 12137, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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