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Counting the Homeless


  • James D. Wright

    (Tulane University)

  • Joel A. Devine

    (Tulane University)


Shelter and Street Night (S-Night) was the recent effort by the U.S. Bureau of the Census to include selected components of the nation's homeless population in the 1990 decennial count. Teams of investigators in five cities (New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Phoenix, and New Orleans) were contracted by the Census Bureau's Center for Survey Methods Research to assist in assessing various aspects of the S-Night enumeration. Each team compiled independent shelter lists that were compared against the Bureau's lists and also undertook experiments to assess the reliability of the enumeration effort. This introductory statement reviews the design features, methods, findings, and recommendations that were common to all five studies presented in a special issue focused on counting the homeless.

Suggested Citation

  • James D. Wright & Joel A. Devine, 1992. "Counting the Homeless," Evaluation Review, , vol. 16(4), pages 355-364, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:evarev:v:16:y:1992:i:4:p:355-364

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Brunello, Giorgio & Checchi, Daniele, 2005. "School quality and family background in Italy," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 563-577, October.
    2. Massimiliano Bratti & Daniele Checchi & Guido de Blasio, 2008. "Does the Expansion of Higher Education Increase the Equality of Educational Opportunities? Evidence from Italy," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(s1), pages 53-88, June.
    3. Di Liberto, Adriana, 2008. "Education and Italian regional development," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 94-107, February.
    4. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Wössmann, 2006. "Does Educational Tracking Affect Performance and Inequality? Differences- in-Differences Evidence Across Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(510), pages 63-76, March.
    5. Daniele Checchi & Vito Peragine, 2010. "Inequality of opportunity in Italy," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 8(4), pages 429-450, December.
    6. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Vassilis Tselios, 2009. "Education And Income Inequality In The Regions Of The European Union," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 411-437.
    7. Massimiliano Bratti & Daniele Checchi & Antonio Filippin, 2007. "Geographical Differences in Italian Students' Mathematical Competencies: Evidence from Pisa 2003," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 66(3), pages 299-333, November.
    8. Cullen, Julie Berry & Jacob, Brian A. & Levitt, Steven D., 2005. "The impact of school choice on student outcomes: an analysis of the Chicago Public Schools," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 729-760, June.
    9. Bratti, Massimiliano & Checchi, Daniele & Filippin, Antonio, 2007. "Territorial Differences in Italian Students’ Mathematical Competencies: Evidence from PISA 2003," IZA Discussion Papers 2603, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Agasisti, Tommaso & Cordero-Ferrera, Jose M., 2013. "Educational disparities across regions: A multilevel analysis for Italy and Spain," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 1079-1102.
    11. YerosParis, 2012. "Book Review: Henry Bernstein (2010)," Agrarian South: Journal of Political Economy, Centre for Agrarian Research and Education for South, vol. 1(3), pages 341-346, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. John Quigley & Steven Raphael, 2001. "The Economics Of Homelessness: The Evidence From North America," International Journal of Housing Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(3), pages 323-336.

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