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Strategic Environmental Assessment: necessity, principles and specificities


  • Monika Sabeva

    (University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria)


With the development of market economy, the upgrading of manufacturing activities and the globalization of all spheres of public life, it now becomes clear that the pace of economic growth may decrease and even to acquire a negative entry, under the influence of environmental pollution. This requires an assessment of environmental risks, their management, reduction and/or prevention. SEA is an essential tool for integrating environmental considerations into the preparation and adoption of plans and programs which are likely to have significant effects on the environment. The purpose of SEA is to detect the environmental issues at an early stage of development the strategic decision-making and to assess the possible effects of their implementation. The basic principles to be observed in SEA are integration, dialogue, responsibility, willingness to defend the decisions taken in the process, awareness (information), flexibility and democracy. SEA procedure is characterized by the following features: 1.Public participation should be an inseparable part of the process; 2.Integrating of the planning process and the process of environmental assessment and continuous contact between the two teams; 3.Successful consultations amongst with the stakeholders. The relations between man and the environment are a prerequisite for the occurrence of a number of changes in it, that can significantly deteriorate the environmental conditions. This threatens ecosystems, social stability, health and economic development and requires strict measures towards nature conservation and preventing (or limiting) the adverse impacts.

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  • Monika Sabeva, 2015. "Strategic Environmental Assessment: necessity, principles and specificities," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 9(1), pages 90-102, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:rse:wpaper:v:9:y:2015:i:1:p:90-102

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    SEA; prevention; sustainable development; preventive control; environmental management;

    JEL classification:

    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics
    • Q59 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Other


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