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Social economy: going local to achieve the Strategy Europe 2020. Romania Case


  • Cristina Barna

    () (Assoc. Prof. Ph.D. at University of Bucharest, Romania; Vice – President of Pro Global Science Association, Romania)


Social economy could be considered a response to the crisis in Europe, a new European economic system able to unlock social innovation, growth and jobs and to achieve the set of ambitious objectives to be reached by 2020 in the five main areas: employment, innovation, climate change, education and poverty. Its role is recognized at EU level: in April 2011 the European Commission delivered the final text of “Single Market Act – Twelve levers to boost growth and strengthen confidence”, where lever 8 is “social business” with the goal to encourage social entrepreneurship, so all the actors of the single market who have chosen to pursue not only financial profits as a goal, but also social, environmental or ethical progress. Moreover, social economy is present in draft regulations regarding EU Cohesion policy 2014 – 2020. Support to social entrepreneurship figures among the future investment priorities of the Regulation of ESF and of the Regulation of ERDF. In this very supportive European context, in 2011 Romania begins to do the first steps towards the social economy, thanks to the SOP HRD 2007-2013 projects financed by ESF, Key Area of Intervention 6.1- “Developing Social Economy”. This paper presents also an overview of the conceptual framework of social economy, focusing on the emergence of social enterprise - an alternative model to the profit maximizing firm, not regulated yet in Romania, but more viable in the current socio-economic context: changes in the demand for and supply of welfare services, bottom-up mobilization, emergence of new types of enterprises and concepts. In the last part, the paper analyses in details the Romania case – the history of social economy in Romania, key-actors at present, the first statistics on social economy from “Atlas of Social Economy – Romania 2011”, the present challenges and the future directions.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristina Barna, 2012. "Social economy: going local to achieve the Strategy Europe 2020. Romania Case," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 3(1), pages 14-21, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:rse:wpaper:v:3:y:2012:i:1:p:14-21

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/8306 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Sébastien Miroudot & Patrick Messerlin, 2004. "Trade Liberalization in South East Europe: Review of Conformity of 23 FTAs with the MoU," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/8306, Sciences Po.
    3. Milica Uvalic, 2001. "Regional Cooperation in Southeastern Europe," One Europe or Several? Working Papers 17, One-Europe Programme.
    4. Edward Christie, 2001. "Potential Trade in Southeast Europe: A Gravity Model Approach," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 11, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cristina BARNA & Ancuta VAMEsU, 2014. "Reviving Social Economy in Romania – between emerging social enterprises in all sectors, surviving communist coops, and subsidiaries of globalization actors," CIRIEC Working Papers 1407, CIRIEC - Université de Liège.

    More about this item


    social economy; social entrepreneurship; social enterprise; Strategy Europe 2020;

    JEL classification:

    • L30 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - General
    • L31 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Nonprofit Institutions; NGOs; Social Entrepreneurship


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