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The Other Home. Romanian Migrants In Spain


  • Romana Emilia Cucuruzan

    () (Faculty of European Studies, Babes Bolyai University Cluj Napoca, Romania)

  • Valentina Vasilache

    (Faculty of European Studies, Babes Bolyai University Cluj Napoca, Romania)


Nowadays, the circulatory labour migration represents the main form of Romanian migration, with Italy and Spain as first destination countries for Romanians seeking better job and life opportunities. The present article focuses on the case of the Romanian migrants working and living in Spain. Firstly, we will briefly present the evolution of the migration history in Spain, stressing the important change of migration status: from emigration to immigration country. Then, the analysis will focus on the most important migrant group coming from an EU member state: from official statistic data provided by Spanish institutions, to researches carried out in the field of Romanian migrants’ experience in Spain. Our main contribution will consist of a micro exploratory study designed to investigate the situation of the Romanians working in one of the most dynamic economies of EU. The field study was carried out in the region of Valencia, in the spring of 2008 . Finally, several conclusions will be drawn, without the aim of generalizing the main findings, but of complementing the research developments in this particular field.

Suggested Citation

  • Romana Emilia Cucuruzan & Valentina Vasilache, 2009. "The Other Home. Romanian Migrants In Spain," Romanian Journal of Regional Science, Romanian Regional Science Association, vol. 3(1), pages 63-81, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:rrs:journl:v:3:y:2009:i:1:p:63-81

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    labour migration; migration networks; immigrant workers.;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers


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