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The Manager and the Managerial Tools: Job Description



    () (The Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romania)


    () (The Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romania)


The management specialists and the management literature often mention the decisive role played by the methodological component of management (i.e. the managerial tools, the design methodologies, reengineering and support of a functional management systems) in the scientism of manager's, work. In the context of professionalization of both managers and management, treating scientifically, the management processes, becomes a major subject with impact on both quality and efficiency of management. This paper is going to approach one of the apparently common managerial tool, many times overlooked, known mostly as just an organisational document: job description. How many managers consider it important? How many managers do really know what is its content? How many managers know how to write one? How many know when a job description should be updated and how to do that? These are some of the questions we aim to answer next and at the same time pinpoint the need of turning this organisational and legal document into a real managerial tool.

Suggested Citation

  • Ion VERBONCU & Luise ZEININGER, 2015. "The Manager and the Managerial Tools: Job Description," REVISTA DE MANAGEMENT COMPARAT INTERNATIONAL/REVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL COMPARATIVE MANAGEMENT, Faculty of Management, Academy of Economic Studies, Bucharest, Romania, vol. 16(5), pages 603-614, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:rom:rmcimn:v:16:y:2015:i:5:p:603-614

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Peter B. Clark & Jacques J. Polak, 2004. "International Liquidity and the Role of the SDR in the International Monetary System," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 51(1), pages 1-3.
    2. Axel Dreher, 2009. "IMF conditionality: theory and evidence," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(1), pages 233-267, October.
    3. Rajan, Raghuram G. & Subramanian, Arvind, 2011. "Aid, Dutch disease, and manufacturing growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 106-118, January.
    4. Benedict Clements & Sanjeev Gupta & Masahiro Nozaki, 2013. "What happens to social spending in IMF-supported programmes?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(28), pages 4022-4033, October.
    5. Przeworski, Adam & Vreeland, James Raymond, 2000. "The effect of IMF programs on economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 385-421, August.
    6. Graham Bird, 2001. "IMF Programmes: Is there a conditionality Laffer Curve?," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 2(2), pages 29-49, April.
    7. Joseph E. Stiglitz, 2004. "Capital-market Liberalization, Globalization, and the IMF," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 57-71, Spring.
    8. Kentikelenis, Alexander E. & Stubbs, Thomas H. & King, Lawrence P., 2015. "Structural adjustment and public spending on health: Evidence from IMF programs in low-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 169-176.
    9. Mohsin S. Khan & Sunil Sharma, 2003. "IMF Conditionality and Country Ownership of Adjustment Programs," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 18(2), pages 227-248.
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    More about this item


    managerial tools; management processes; job description; individual objectives; managerial methodology; official authority; personal authority.;

    JEL classification:

    • M10 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - General
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation


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