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Introduzione: la "ritirata" del neoliberismo?


  • Carlo D'Ippoliti

    () (Sapienza Università di Roma)


The article introduces the new issue of the journal. It discusses what reasons may explain the fact that austerity measures are increasingly criticised by vast numbers of economists while they are still endorsed by all EU institutions. It is here suggested that the neoliberal stance seem to have gradually shifted away from the economic debate to move to a moralistic and a juridical level, focussed on the formal legitimacy (within the given institutional setup) of the proposed policy alternatives to tackle the euro crisis while neglecting and abstaining from criticising their underlying rationale. This ‘retreat’ allows for defunct economic theories to still dominate the political debate.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlo D'Ippoliti, 2012. "Introduzione: la "ritirata" del neoliberismo?," Moneta e Credito, Economia civile, vol. 65(259), pages 183-192.
  • Handle: RePEc:psl:moneta:2012:31

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cynamon Barry Z. & Fazzari Steven M., 2008. "Household Debt in the Consumer Age: Source of Growth--Risk of Collapse," Capitalism and Society, De Gruyter, vol. 3(2), pages 1-32, October.
    2. Kazimierz Laski & Roman Römisch, 2001. "Growth and Savings in USA and Japan," wiiw Working Papers 16, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    3. Julio Lopez & Tracy Mott, 1999. "Kalecki Versus Keynes on the Determinants of Investment," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 291-301.
    4. Fitoussi Jean Paul & Saraceno Francesco, 2010. "Europe: How Deep Is a Crisis? Policy Responses and Structural Factors Behind Diverging Performances," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-19, January.
    5. Aldo Barba & Massimo Pivetti, 2009. "Rising household debt: Its causes and macroeconomic implications--a long-period analysis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(1), pages 113-137, January.
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    More about this item


    Introduction; euro; crisis; neoliberism;

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • B50 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - General
    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian


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